The Doctrine of Discovery: The Episcopal Church, Indigenous Peoples, and the Necessity of Decolonizing Christianity

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 7–8:30 P.M., via Zoom

A Presentation and Discussion with The Rev. Rachel Taber-Hamilton

The Rev. Rachel Taber-Hamilton

Saint Mark’s welcomes The Rev. Rachel Taber-Hamilton, who is Shackan First Nation, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Everett, and Coordinator of Ethnic Ministries Circles of Color. The Doctrine of Discovery historically informed the legal premise for justifying the forces of colonialism, including the enslavement of African and Asian peoples as well as the oppression and genocide of indigenous peoples. Rev. Taber-Hamilton will share the historical development of the Doctrine of Discovery, the historical role of the Church, and real-world contemporary examples of its continuing impact. The Doctrine of Discovery remains embedded in the legal policies of the U.S. and colonized nations throughout the world, policies that maintain the theological, political, and legal justification for continued neo-colonialism, including the seizure of land, genocide, oppression, and racism. The Episcopal Church National Convention in 2009 formally renounced the doctrine and urged dioceses’ reflection and action. Come learn how allies can help deconstruct the effects of the Doctrine of Discovery as a social force in our Church, in our nation, and in our world.

Register to attend here.

Above: "American Progress" (1872) by John Gast, an allegory for white American colonization and "Manifest Destiny."

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