Earth Ministry Presents: Salmon, Justice, & Community

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 6 P.M.–7:30 P.M.

This program is presented by Earth Ministry/Washington Interfaith Power & Light, a Saint Mark's partner organization with longstanding links to the cathedral.

Salmon are a Northwest icon, a species of great cultural, ecological, and spiritual significance. Author Timothy Egan once defined the Northwest as “wherever the salmon can get to.” In the Northwest, our regional identity is steeped in mighty rivers and the fish therein, and the connections we share run deep.

Join LeeAnne Beres and Rev. John Rosenberg of Earth Ministry to explore the sacredness of salmon and the orcas that depend on them. You'll hear about how the faith community is bringing people together to restore the Lower Snake River for the benefit of all, and have the opportunity to ask questions and put your faith into action.

This event is part of a fall online speaker series hosted by our partners at Save Our Wild Salmon.

Learn more about the event and the speakers here.

Register to attend the event here.

“Wonder in Creation”: Two Wednesday Forums

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TWO WEDNESDAYS, SEPTEMBER 16 & 23, 7–8:30 P.M., via Zoom

Wonder in Creation: A Two-Week Series of Spiritual Practices in Creation

How do you experience God in everyday life? How might your daily living itself be and become a spiritual practice? The Creation Care and Faith Formation ministries will jointly host a two-week series in September to explore how spiritual practices outside bring opportunities to encounter presence, connection and reflection. Each evening, a panel from Saint Mark's will reflect on their own experiences, and you will have time to share your own. We'll also introduce tangible ways to share in active spiritual practices and reflect on how they may nurture reflection and faith in our response.
Join us to "Celebrate the Harvest" on 9/16. The panelists for the first session will be:
  • Rob Reid
  • Carolyn Blount
  • Keiko Maruyama & Jamie Rubio
  • Lisa Graumlich (host)

 

The second session, "Mindful Steps," on 9/23, will feature contributions from:
  • Sarah Elwood
  • Robert Stevens
  • The Rev. Earl Grout, Deacon
  • Brother Paul Dahlke
  • Nancy & Andy Valaas
  • Emily Meeks (host)
For questions and to obtain the Zoom link, contact cchapman@saintmarks.org.

Here are pdfs of lists of references and resources related to the two sessions:

Session 1: Celebrating the Harvest, Sept. 16

Session 2: Take a Next Step: Mindful Steps, Sept. 23


Video of both sessions is now available:

In addition, below are some additional links shared from the chat and conversation during Part 2:

Year of Seattle Parks 

Vote with Creation as a Value
 
Books on Ecology and Spirituality
Diocesan Resource Center - email Sue (resource@ecww.org
)
 
Muck Rack
A podcast series on environmental perspectives by Ashley Aheard
 
The Year You Finally Read About Climate change

"Read about the future of the planet,"
New York Times Book Review.

A Season of Creation

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SEPTEMBER 1–OCTOBER 4, 2020

Saint Mark’s and the greater Episcopal Church joins Christian churches across the world in celebrating the Season of Creation September 1 – October 4. From the Season of Creation website:

“The Season of Creation is a time to renew our relationship with our Creator through repenting, repairing, and rejoicing together. During the Season of Creation, we join our sisters and brothers in the ecumenical family in prayer and action for our common home.”
  • Be inspired by watching Presiding Bishop Curry’s video message below, titled, The Jesus Movement: Good News for All Creation.
  • Weekly "Season of Creation" devotionals will be shared in Sundays & Beyond each week during the month of September — See the complete collection of weekly devotionals below!
  • And plan to attend the "Wonder in Creation" Cathedral Commons offering on September 16 and 23 about spiritual practices in Creation.
You can email marjorie@ringness.org for more information on the ongoing work and conversation of the Creation Care Ministry.

 

Come Hell or High Water: Climate Justice Webinar

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FILM: WATCH ANY TIME BETWEEN MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3–5
WEBINAR: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5, 5 P.M., via Zoom

Please note that some information listed in this week's Sundays & Beyond about this event was in error. A generous member of the Creation Care Ministry has made it possible for people from Saint Mark's to watch the film for free. Visit https://interfaithpowerandlight.salsalabs.org/comehellorhighwaterfilm to register and indicate "Saint Mark's Cathedral" under "congregation." Also, note that the free webinar begins at 5 p.m.

Saint Mark's Creation Care Ministry invites you to view Come Hell or High Water: The Battle for Turkey Creek, an award- winning film about the unjust impact of climate change on an historic black community, sponsored by Interfaith Power and Light. You can view the film for free any time between Monday, August 3 and Wednesday, August 5 — just register here and indicate Saint Mark’s Cathedral as congregation. You will receive a link to watch the film after you register.

Additionally, on Wednesday, August 5, at 5 p.m. PDT, a webinar follows with Leah Mahan, the filmmaker, and Derrick Evans, the activist featured in the film. Sign up separately to attend the webinar using this link.


Come Hell or High Water: The Battle for Turkey Creek follows the painful but inspiring journey of Derrick Evans, a Boston teacher who moves home to coastal Mississippi when the graves of his ancestors are bulldozed to make way for the sprawling city of Gulfport. Over the course of a decade, Derrick and his neighbors stand up to powerful corporate interests and politicians and face ordeals that include Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil disaster in their struggle for self-determination and environmental justice.

This is an award winning film about the unjust impact of climate change on an historic black community. After watching the film, attend the webinar to learn ways we can practice being allies in the fight for safe and healthy black communities. Moderated by Susan Stephenson, the conversation will center around the disproportionate impacts of climate change on black and brown communities.

“This powerful documentary illustrates a classic case of environmental injustice and exposes raw in-your-face Mississippi racial politics. Come Hell or High Water is a perfect lesson that we are not living in a post-racial era.”
-Dr. Robert Bullard, “father of environmental justice”

View the trailer below:

Cathedral Bees Update

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Cathedral Bees Update

The cathedral building has two beehives on the roof of Bloedel Hall. Thanks to beekeeper Rob Reid, our bees are thriving! Scroll down to view pictures.

Your prayers for the health of our hives are welcome. For more information about protecting pollinators, visit this link.

If you are interested in helping out with the bees, contact the cathedral and we will put you in touch with Rob.

Sundays & Beyond Update August 30, 2020

The bees and beekeepers have been hard at work. In July, one of the hives lost its queen. However, wild bees are able to create a new queen with remaining larvae, so apiarists Rob and Jaime moved eggs from the healthy hive to the queenless one. Once the queen was established, she then started laying fertile eggs. We're happy to report the success of Rob and Jaime's work - both beehives are now thriving!

Sundays & Beyond Update July 19, 2020

The active honeybee hives on the roof of Bloedel Hall have been busy. And, apparently, they have a sense of humor: Q: Why do virgin bees mate in the air? A: They can’t get any privacy in the hive. Consider planting pollinator-friendly plants in your own garden or window box. And reduce or eliminate pesticides on your plants.

Sundays & Beyond Update July 12, 2020

Did you know St. Mark’s has two active honeybee hives on the roof of Bloedel Hall? Installed on May 10, they include thousands of residents. Recently, our apiarist Rob Reid suspected one of our hives had lost its queen because, when inspecting the frames, he was unable to find eggs. But wild bees are able to create a new queen with remaining larvae. To assist our bees, Rob and Jaime Rubio moved eggs from the healthy hive to the queenless one. Now the bees can create queen cells and feed them “royal jelly.” If all goes well, in less than a month, the new queen will mate in mid air with drone bees and start laying fertile eggs. There’s lots of miraculous science involved. You can see where the expression “the birds and the bees” comes from.

Sundays & Beyond Update July 5, 2020

This week’s thought: The world is facing a mass extinction of species, including pollinators. Bees are critically important to our global food production and nutritional security. Estimates suggest that pollinators directly contribute US$235–$577 billion to global food production each year. Without pollinators, many of the foods we depend on would become scarce, putting life on our planet at risk. When planting your flower garden this summer, consider planting pollinator-friendly plants. Take Earth Day Network’s Pesticide Pledge, and learn about additional actions you can take to help protect pollinators.

 

June Update from Beekeeper Rob

The bee population in our hives is increasing rapidly. We have added a second deep hive box to both hives. I may try to split an existing hive and create a third hive. Providing another queen can be tricky though.

Some of you have joined me in caring for the bees already. Thank you for your company, Jaime, Keiko, Yoshi, Barbara and Steve, and Nancy.

May Update from Beekeeper Rob

Penny and I picked up bees from the Snohomish Bee Company at the Monroe Fairgrounds last Sunday afternoon. Then, we “installed” two “nucs” of bees into two of the existing hives on the roof of Bloedel Hall. I ordered them several months ago and they were shipped here from Northern California a week ago. Each nuc comes with 5 frames and a working queen and thousands of worker bees. It was quick and easy to move the 5 frames, one at a time, into our hives. In fact, miraculously, I saw the queen on one of the frames as I was moving it from nuc box to hive.

 

 

Bees update June 2020

Bees update August 2020

Climate Change Forum

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Climate Change Forum with Drawdown Seattle: MAY 4 & 11, 7–8:30 P.M., Via Zoom

Led by his faith to be a steward of life on this planet, Scott Henson is the co-founder of Drawdown Seattle, a collection of concerned and engaged Seattle citizens who are interested in enacting proven solutions which create the possibility of reversing the global climate crisis we face. Scott will lead two sessions focused on introducing “Project Drawdown” as well as facilitating the beginning of your personal action plans to help reverse global warming. Through videos and group activities, we will learn about a comprehensive plan to reverse global warming from Project Drawdown—a scientific study that identified 100 solutions that, together, could actually reverse global warming by 2050. These solutions encompass the energy we use, the food we eat, and the cities we live in. Let’s shift the conversation, from “Game over” to “Game on!” By the end you will see the vital role you can play in the movement to reverse global warming.

Resources and references relating to this event may be found here. Videos of both parts of this two-part event are available below:

Partner Organizations

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Earth Day Northwest 2020 is a coalition of businesses, non-profits, faith communities, indigenous tribal leaders, and community groups from the Pacific Northwest who have come together to create meaningful change towards the goal of a more livable, equitable, and sustainable city, region, and planet. These effort are focused around the 50th anniversary of Earth Day (April 22, 2020). On the EDNW2020 website, you can learn about local and regional initiatives, take the pledge to take action and empower change, and find a large collection of actions we can take today as individuals. Dean Steve Thomason is a member of the Leadership Council of EDNW2020, and Saint Mark's Cathedral is a partner organization.

Earth Ministry has been a national leader in engaging the faith community in environmental stewardship and advocacy for over 25 years. Saint Mark's members were involved in the founding of the organization in 1992, and the cathedral is a "Greening Congregation" partner.

National Religious Coalition on Creation Care is an interfaith organization with active engagement concerning our world's most pressing environmental issues: Climate, Energy, Forests, Oceans, and Wilderness. The NRCCC's Religious Declaration of Unprecedented Human Emergency is a powerful statement signed by dozens of religious leaders, including Bishop of Olympia Greg Rickel.

The GreenFaith Partnership is a worldwide organization that inspires, educates, organizes, and mobilizes people of diverse religious and spiritual backgrounds globally for environmental action.

Friends of the Saint Mark's Greenbelt. The Greenbelt slope to the south and west of the cathedral is an asset to the entire community that has been entrusted to the cathedral. Friends of Saint Mark’s Greenbelt is a unit of the Green Seattle Partnership which helps maintain and restore the land by removing invasive plants, maintaining the trails and replanting with native vegetation. For infomation about bi-monthly work parties contact:
Joe Roza

Creation Care Resources

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Click here for an extensive list of books, articles, videos, and web resources assembled by the Saint Mark's Creation Care ministry team.

The Episcopal Diocese of Olympia's Climate & Creation Care page contains a number of useful links, including a message from Bishop Greg Rickel.

The Diocese of Olympia's Carbon Offset Cooperative Mission
is a joint project between our diocese and the Episcopal Diocese of the Southern Philippines.

The Carbon Tracker
is a tool offered by The Episcopal Church to help quantify the impact of our choices on Carbon emissions.

The Creation Care Pledge is offered by The Episcopal Church as a way to commit to meaningful action to to live more simply, humbly and gently on the Earth, and to stand with those most vulnerable to the harmful effects of environmental degradation and climate change.