Compline on the 5th Sunday after Pentecost, 2021

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Compline on The Fifth Sunday after Pentecost | June 27, 2021, 9:30 p.m.

See the Order of Service here. Each week's repertoire can be found here.

LEAFLETS

  • The Service Leaflet contains all you need to fully participate in each liturgy from home.

COFFEE HOUR

  • Virtual Coffee Hour: Immediately following the Sunday morning service, everyone is welcome to gather in a Virtual Coffee Hour over Zoom. Join using this link.
  • Monthly Newcomers Coffee (first Sunday of every month only): Immediately following the Sunday morning service, come meet people and ask questions at a special virtual coffee hour with clergy over Zoom. Join using this link. The next offering will be Sunday, June 6.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Limited in-person worship has now resumed. You must register in advance to attend in person. Read more, including how to register for an upcoming service, here.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Looking for the Livestream video archive? It now has its own page here

A Creation Care Reflection by Doug Thorpe

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by Doug Thorpe

June 21, 2021

In late May, an article in The  New York Review of Books tells me that “a national poll showed that 28 percent of Republicans agreed that ‘things have gotten so far off track, true American patriots may have to resort to violence in order to save our country.”  And what’s driving this fear and anger?  According to political scientist Robert A. Pape, the answer is “fear of the Great Replacement”—meaning, of course, that “minorities are progressively replacing white populations due to mass immigration policies and low birthrates.”

In short, racial grievances.

I’m reading this the day after attending—in person!—the cathedral’s 9 a.m. service, officiated by our friend and former Saint Mark’s staff member Malcolm McLaurin, the first African American man in this diocese to be ordained to the priesthood.

Which is good news—and also, of course, sobering news, given that this cathedral has stood for almost a century.

Well, we are a majority white congregation, and a majority white denomination. Which just means that we have to work harder to forge relationships across racial and ethnic boundaries, which we can do in part by sharing in work that crosses over.

For example:  Environmental Justice.

A small summertime example:  Bill McKibben tells us in his weekly New Yorker eblast that a ten-degree-Fahrenheit jump in temperature during the warm season was associated with an increase in emergency-room visits for “mental-health disorders, self-injury/suicide, and intentional injury/homicide.” Both these effects show up more strongly in this country in Black and Hispanic patients—probably, as Dr. Rupa Basu explained (She’s the chief of air-and-climate epidemiology at California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment), because those groups disproportionately live in low-income neighborhoods. “They’re often in areas where there are more fossil-fuel emissions, fewer green spaces, and more blacktop and cement, which really absorbs and retains the heat,” she said. “And also living closer to freeways. That exacerbates air pollution. And, with the heat, that’s a synergistic effect. It’s environmental racism that leads to these differences in exposure.” Some people, she added, bristle at hearing that: “Someone said to me, ‘Oh, so now we’re breathing different air?’ And I said, ‘Yes, that’s exactly right. We can track it down to the Zip Code level.’” Call it critical race epidemiology.

There are things we can do, and Saint Mark's is actively seeking for these large and small solutions. And so it was a small pleasure that, on the same day that our parish celebrated the calling and ordination of Malcolm, we also joined together in the cathedral parking lot and blessed—yes, blessed—the new charging station for electric cars. In doing so we honored the legacy of Jim Mulligan, one of the founders of Earth Ministry and a long term supporter of Creation Care at the cathedral.

As Jim’s widow Ruth said in her comments, Jim would surely have found the humor in the situation: I mean, putting a plaque on a charging station is not exactly like having your face carved on Mount Rushmore. But, as Ruth also said, Jim liked to work behind the scenes, quietly, and yes, with a good sense of humor.

And so there we were, gathered together in the parking lot on a warm June morning.  One small step, as one of our astronauts once said.  But it was a step that put him on the moon.  That’s where small steps can lead.


Longtime Saint Mark's parishioner and former vestry member Doug Thorpe is Professor Emeritus of English at Seattle Pacific University.

 

Ruth Muligan speaks at the E.V. charging station dedication, June 20, 2021.

Compline on the 4th Sunday after Pentecost, 2021

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Compline on The Fourth Sunday after Pentecost | June 20, 2021, 9:30 p.m.

See the Order of Service here. Each week's repertoire can be found here.

LEAFLETS

  • The Service Leaflet contains all you need to fully participate in each liturgy from home.

COFFEE HOUR

  • Virtual Coffee Hour: Immediately following the Sunday morning service, everyone is welcome to gather in a Virtual Coffee Hour over Zoom. Join using this link.
  • Monthly Newcomers Coffee (first Sunday of every month only): Immediately following the Sunday morning service, come meet people and ask questions at a special virtual coffee hour with clergy over Zoom. Join using this link. The next offering will be Sunday, June 6.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Limited in-person worship has now resumed. You must register in advance to attend in person. Read more, including how to register for an upcoming service, here.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Looking for the Livestream video archive? It now has its own page here

The Fourth Sunday after Pentecost, 2021

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NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Looking for the Livestream video archive? It now has its own page here

Juneteenth Service of Freedom & Healing, 2021

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Diocese of Olympia Circles of Color Present: Juneteenth Service of Freedom and Healing | Saturday, June 19, 2021, 12:30 p.m. 

Offertory donations support the Richard Younge Curates of Color Fund which was established to honor the ministry of the Rev. Richard Younge and to support the ongoing formation of newly ordained people of color in the Diocese of Olympia.

Please write "Juneteenth" in the memo line. Give using: saintmarks.org/give or venmo.com/saintmarkscathedralseattle or mail a check to: 1245 10th Ave E, Seattle WA 98109


This liturgy is created and presented by the Circles of Color of the Diocese of Olympia. ecww.org/event/juneteenth-healing-service/

Learn more here: ecww.org/ethnic-ministries-circles-of-color-in-the-diocese-of-olympia/

LEAFLETS

  • The Service Leaflet contains all you need to fully participate in each liturgy from home.

COFFEE HOUR

  • Virtual Coffee Hour: Immediately following the Sunday morning service, everyone is welcome to gather in a Virtual Coffee Hour over Zoom. Join using this link.
  • Monthly Newcomers Coffee (first Sunday of every month only): Immediately following the Sunday morning service, come meet people and ask questions at a special virtual coffee hour with clergy over Zoom. Join using this link. The next offering will be Sunday, July 4.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Limited in-person worship has now resumed. You must register in advance to attend in person. Read more, including how to register for an upcoming service, here.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Looking for the Livestream video archive? It now has its own page here

DEEPER DIVE: A New Series, Third Sunday of the Month

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DEEPER DIVE

A New Saint Mark’s program exploring the Church, faith, and spirituality

THIRD SUNDAY OF THE MONTH VIA ZOOM: APRIL 18, MAY 16, JUNE 20, 12:30–2 P.M.

Mark your calendars and join Cathedral clergy via Zoom for a DEEPER DIVE into the ways the Episcopal Church worships, the way we practice and grow in faith, and the ways we experience and evolve in Spirit – with time for learning, questions, and discussion together


JUNE 20: Who Do You Say that I Am? Christology in Daily Life with Canon Jennifer King Daugherty

Over time and across cultures, faithful people have understood Jesus the Christ in different, life-giving ways. Canon Daugherty will discuss some of these traditions, then lead the group in exploring how our experience of pandemic has impacted our answer to Jesus’ question, “Who do you say that I am?”

Canon Daugherty recommends reading these two articles in advance of her presentation:

Read More

Dedication of the Cathedral’s new Electric Vehicle Charging Station

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SUNDAY, JUNE 20, 10:15 A.M.

Gather on the upper south parking lot and around the Peace Pole as we dedicate the new EV Charging Station in memory of long-time member Jim Mulligan, who was a pioneer in creation care and environmental justice efforts.

The brief ceremony of about ten minutes falls between the two Eucharists that morning.


Here is an article from the Most recent issue of The Rubric about this wonderful gift to the community:

"Building a Charge: The Gift of an E.V. Charging Station"


UPDATE: here are some photos from the dedication (click to enlarge):

“Is EfM for Me?”—An Introduction to Education for Ministry

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UPDATE: View video of this event below

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 7 P.M., via Zoom

If you have attended Saint Mark's for some time, you have probably heard about Education for Ministry many times—especially this time of year when registration for the upcoming session is open. If you are new to Saint Mark's, you might be hearing about EfM for the first time. But what it is really like to participate in an EfM class? What sort of work is required? What happens at the class meetings? Are there exams??? Please consider attending a Zoom forum on Wednesday evening, June 23, to learn all awhat EfM is... and what it isn't! Sacristan Michael Seewer will be the host, and Saint Mark's team of EfM mentors will be the panelists. Join using this Zoom link.

Three different classes meet weekly September to June at Saint Mark’s:

  • Sundays, 6:30–8:30 p.m.
  • Mondays, 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
  • Mondays, 6:30–8:30 p.m.

Tuition, including books, is $375. Please inquire by contacting class mentors: Sunday evening: Penelope Jackson; Monday morning: Maria Coldwell; Monday evening: Tom Hayton.


Read More

Compline on the Third Sunday after Pentecost 2021

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Compline on The Third Sunday after Pentecost | June 13, 2021, 9:30 p.m.

See the Order of Service here. Each week's repertoire can be found here.

LEAFLETS

  • The Service Leaflet contains all you need to fully participate in each liturgy from home.

COFFEE HOUR

  • Virtual Coffee Hour: Immediately following the Sunday morning service, everyone is welcome to gather in a Virtual Coffee Hour over Zoom. Join using this link.
  • Monthly Newcomers Coffee (first Sunday of every month only): Immediately following the Sunday morning service, come meet people and ask questions at a special virtual coffee hour with clergy over Zoom. Join using this link. The next offering will be Sunday, June 6.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Limited in-person worship has now resumed. You must register in advance to attend in person. Read more, including how to register for an upcoming service, here.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Looking for the Livestream video archive? It now has its own page here

An Introduction to Saint Mark’s Statement of Lament and Commitment to Action

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On May 25, 2021, the cathedral Vestry unanimously adopted a Statement of Lament and Commitment to Action, a revised and expanded statement of principals for this community.

This document has been in the works for many months, and builds on the cathedral's 2016 Statement, titled Renewing Our Covenant—which for many years has been posted on the church's front doors—and A Covenant to Root Out Racism, created in Diocese of Missouri and adopted by the Diocese of Olympia at the 2020 Diocesan Convention.

Here is a brief (2-minute) video by Senior Warden Peter McClung, describing the documents origins and goals. A transcript of the video can be read below.

TRANSCRIPT

I am pleased to present on behalf of your Cathedral Vestry the Saint Mark’s Statement of Lament and Commitment to Action.

Over four-and-a-half years ago, the Vestry of Saint Mark’s articulated our commitments as a parish in the original version of this document, which after its adoption in December of 2016 became a banner and description of our work in our community and world. The commitments we made drove new and re-energized ministries and outreach, including deep engagement with the Sanctuary movement, refugees, and those in our community like Lowell Elementary School, just to name a few.

In October of last year, the Diocese of Olympia at our Annual Convention adopted Resolution Number 9, an Anti-Racism Covenant developed by Bishop Deon Johnson and the Episcopal Diocese of Missouri, with a recommendation to adopt it within the parish communities within our diocese.

Since then, a subcommittee of the Vestry including Vestry members and clergy have reviewed these two documents to discern and align them into a reframed Saint Mark’s Statement. The result of that work has recently been approved by the Vestry, and it is delivered to you today in the Saint Mark’s Statement of Lament and Commitment to Action.

You will immediately notice that a large section of the Statement presented to you laments actions by the church and individuals, both currently and in the past. These laments are not only an acknowledgment of actions of the past but a current participation in the pain suffered by those within our community.

In addition to the laments, the Commitment to Action section is broader than previously stated, with greater inclusion of people, communities, and ministries tied directly to our three mutual ministry goals of our parish: Creation Care and Carbon Reduction, Restorative Justice and Systematic Change, and Innovative and Intergenerational Community.

All of us within your Vestry hope you take the time to read and reflect on this Statement of Lament and Commitment to Action and that upon your reflection, your soul is sparked to join together in the important work of our community.

The Pentecost Evangelist Banner

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In the season after Pentecost each year, a stunning quilted banner is displayed on the reredos.

First displayed at Saint Mark’s in 2017, this striking banner depicts the symbols of the four evangelists (the Four Living Creatures from the book of Ezekiel). It was made in the 1980s by Northwest textile artist and sculptor Margaret Hays.

Margaret Hays was born into a  family of women artists in 1931. She received her MFA in 1975 from the University of Washington. Her passion was sculpting with fabric and liturgical art was her primary subject, with an emphasis on mother and child. Throughout her career as an artist, she contributed much to churches across the Diocese of Olympia. She was a member of St. John’s, Snohomish. She died peacefully in 2016 at the age of 85.

The evangelists banner was displayed for many years at St. Hilda-St. Patrick Episcopal Church in Edmonds, WA, but was ultimately given to the Diocesan Altar Guild. The Altar Guild gifted this banner to Saint Mark’s Cathedral in 2017. It was repaired and restored in 2017 by Saint Mark’s members Sandra Piscitello and Jo Ann Bailey, and Diocesan Altar Guild chair Sherry Garman, and has been displayed every year in this season since then.

Click the images below to enlarge.

Compline on the Second Sunday after Pentecost, 2021

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Compline on The Second Sunday after Pentecost | June 6, 2021, 9:30 p.m.

See the Order of Service here. Each week's repertoire can be found here.

LEAFLETS

  • The Service Leaflet contains all you need to fully participate in each liturgy from home.

COFFEE HOUR

  • Virtual Coffee Hour: Immediately following the Sunday morning service, everyone is welcome to gather in a Virtual Coffee Hour over Zoom. Join using this link.
  • Monthly Newcomers Coffee (first Sunday of every month only): Immediately following the Sunday morning service, come meet people and ask questions at a special virtual coffee hour with clergy over Zoom. Join using this link. The next offering will be Sunday, June 6.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Limited in-person worship has now resumed. You must register in advance to attend in person. Read more, including how to register for an upcoming service, here.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Looking for the Livestream video archive? It now has its own page here

Compline on the First Sunday after Pentecost: Trinity Sunday, 2021

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Compline on The First Sunday after Pentecost: Trinity Sunday | May 30, 2021, 9:30 p.m.

See the Order of Service here. Each week's repertoire can be found here.

LEAFLETS

  • The Service Leaflet contains all you need to fully participate in each liturgy from home.

COFFEE HOUR

  • Virtual Coffee Hour: Immediately following the Sunday morning service, everyone is welcome to gather in a Virtual Coffee Hour over Zoom. Join using this link.
  • Monthly Newcomers Coffee (first Sunday of every month only): Immediately following the Sunday morning service, come meet people and ask questions at a special virtual coffee hour with clergy over Zoom. Join using this link. The next offering will be Sunday, June 6.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Limited in-person worship has now resumed. You must register in advance to attend in person. Read more, including how to register for an upcoming service, here.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Looking for the Livestream video archive? It now has its own page here

Compline on the Feast of Pentecost, 2021

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Compline on The Feast of Pentecost | May 23, 2021, 9:30 p.m.

See the Order of Service in Eastertide here. Each week's repertoire can be found here.

LEAFLETS

  • The Service Leaflet contains all you need to fully participate in each liturgy from home.

COFFEE HOUR

  • Virtual Coffee Hour: Immediately following the Sunday morning service, everyone is welcome to gather in a Virtual Coffee Hour over Zoom. Join using this link.
  • Monthly Newcomers Coffee (first Sunday of every month only): Immediately following the Sunday morning service, come meet people and ask questions at a special virtual coffee hour with clergy over Zoom. Join using this link. The next offering will be Sunday, June 6.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Limited in-person worship has now resumed. You must register in advance to attend in person. Read more, including how to register for an upcoming service, here.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Looking for the Livestream video archive? It now has its own page here

Pentecost “Way of Love” Revival Service

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Pentecost Revival Service | May 23, 2021, 1 p.m. Pacific

Service Leaflet  |  Direct YouTube link

The Episcopal Church greets Pentecost with One in the Spirit, a Way of Love Revival Weekend designed to fan the flames of hope, celebrate difference, honor creation, foster beloved community, and send people toward Jesus’s Way of Love. At 1 p.m. on the Feast of Pentecost itself—Sunday, May 23—a special worship service will be streamed, featuring elements submitted by a number of Episcopal institutions, including Saint Mark's.

(Click to enlarge.)

LEAFLETS

  • The Service Leaflet contains all you need to fully participate in each liturgy from home.

COFFEE HOUR

  • Virtual Coffee Hour: Immediately following the Sunday morning service, everyone is welcome to gather in a Virtual Coffee Hour over Zoom. Join using this link.
  • Monthly Newcomers Coffee (first Sunday of every month only): Immediately following the Sunday morning service, come meet people and ask questions at a special virtual coffee hour with clergy over Zoom. Join using this link. The next offering will be Sunday, June 6.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Limited in-person worship has now resumed. You must register in advance to attend in person. Read more, including how to register for an upcoming service, here.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Projecting Justice at Saint Mark’s

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photo by Brian Smale

Justice means they would still be alive today. 

May 25 marks the anniversary of the murder of George Floyd, a watershed moment that has re-energized an ongoing nationwide movement and sparked an urgent conversation about the role of policing in our state. In Washington, about 40-50 members of our communities—disproportionately Black, Brown, Indigenous, and AAPI—are killed each year by police officers. That must change.

Beginning on May 25, the Saint Mark’s cathedral building will become a public monument. With the approval of the Vestry, and in collaboration with the ACLU of Washington State, the names of citizens killed by police will be projected onto the façade of the cathedral, in letters over three feet high. With the exception of George Floyd, all the names will be people from Seattle and Western Washington. In this way, Saint Mark’s will use its most visible asset—the cathedral building itself—to “say their names” in this extraordinarily public way, in order to spark discussions and move towards meaningful change in our own community and region.

In the 2021 legislative session, ACLU-WA collaborated with the Washington Coalition on Police Accountability, a coalition which centers the voices of impacted family members whose loved ones have been killed by police. Their work seeks to bring us towards justice by preventing the unnecessary and unjust killing of others by police. Through lobbying, organizing, and policy efforts, the Washington state legislature passed 14 bills on policing, aimed at reducing police violence.  

Special thanks to Spokane Community Against Racism (SCAR) for designing and building our equipment.

Learn more: 

ProjectingJustice.org

Washington Coalition for Police Accountability 

Washington Coalition for Police Accountability Facebook 

ACLU-WA Policing Blog Series 


Updates:

This article contains reflections by Dean Thomason on meeting the family of Herbert Hightower Jr., who visited the cathedral to see their loved one's name projected on May 26.


Victims and Dates of Light Projections: 

May 25 – George Floyd
May 27 – Tommy Le and Mi’Chance Dunlap-Gittens
May 28 – Joel Nelson and Billy Langfitt 
May 29 – Iosia Faletogo and Samuel Toshiro Smith
May 30 – John T. Williams and Stoney Chiefstick
May 31 – Renee DavisCecil Lacy Jr, and Daniel Covarrubias
June 2 – Leonard Thomas and Said Joquin
June 4 – Enosa “EJ” Strickland and Giovonn Joseph-McDade 
June 5 – Matthew Folden and Patrick West
June 6 – Ryan Smith, Damarius Butts, Che Taylor, and Shaun Fuhr 
June 7 – Kevin Peterson Jr, Clando Anitok, and Carlos Hunter 
June 8 – Juan Rene Hummel, Clayton Joseph, Oscar Perez Giron, and Michael Pierce

INFORMATION ABOUT THE NAMED INDIVIDUALS

NOTE: Additional information to be added soon.

Click photos to enlarge

MAY 26

  • photo by Brian Smale

    Charleena Lyles weighed 100 pounds. She was 14 weeks pregnant with three of her 4 children at home when she was killed by Seattle police. Police allege she was holding a paring knife.  They had recently been to her apartment and were aware she struggled with behavioral health issues.  

  • Herbert Hightower Jr. was killed in 2004 by Seattle police while experiencing a mental health crisis. Police claimed Herbert had two knives when they approached him and have changed their story multiple times, first stating that Herbert was walking towards them and they were remorseful for not using non-lethal weapons, then changing it to he was running towards them and they were no longer remorseful. The family learned one of the knives claimed to be found on the scene was a round-edged butter knife. The family still does not know what happened, and no one has been held accountable. Herbert was only 25 years old.  

MAY 27

  • photo by David Wagner

    Tommy Le was shot and killed by police in Burien in 2017. The King County Sheriff's office initially claimed that he was shot while charging at the police with a knife. They later admitted the no knife was involved at all, and that he was shot in the back. An autopsy suggests that he was in fact lying face down on the ground when he was shot. He was 20 years old, 5'4" tall, and described by his family as "nerdy." Office of Law Enforcement Oversight found "serious gaps" in the investigation into the killing, and King County settled a lawsuit with his family in March of 2021. 

  • Mi’Chance Dunlap-Gittens was 17 years old when he was shot in the back while running away from plainclothes police officers in Des Moines, WA, in a botched sting operation in 2017. Mi'Chance was completely innocent of any crime whatsoever—the police were attempting to arrest another teenager (who, as it happens, was also innocent). It is unclear if he ever knew that the men attacking him were police. King County apologized for the killing, and the case led to the implementation of body cameras and dash cams by the King County Sheriff's Office. But the chain of blunders on the part of the police that led to his death should never have occurred. 

MAY 28

  • Joel Nelson’s death in 2016 should not have occurred. Joel was unarmed and police de-escalation should have been used in his incident. The Thurston County Sheriff needs to learn from Joel’s case and implement a transparent process for investigations. Five years later conflicts of interest proving family relationships involved in the Sheriff’s office are still a major role in investigations.
  • Billy Langfitt was 28 years old when he was killed by a Pierce County Sheriff Deputy near Graham Washington, in 2018. Billy was experiencing a mental health crisis and was unarmed when he was shot. The deputy made no effort to de-escalate or use less lethal force.   

MAY 29

  • photo by Kevin Johnson

    Iosia Faletogo was shot by Seattle Police officers the afternoon of December 31, 2018. He was pulled over for a traffic stop and fled the scene on foot. Six officers chased him, tackled him, and held him down. He had a gun on his person, and complied with commands to drop it and not reach for it. One officer shot him point blank in the head, although the officers heard Iosia say “not reaching.”

  • Samuel Toshiro Smith was severely impaired by drugs and alcohol and holding a knife when he was shot by a police officer in Seattle in 2015. Body camera footage shows that he was killed less than two seconds after being given a warning by police. He had no chance to respond. No attempt was made to calm, de-escalate, control, or simply evade the situation. Non-lethal weapons were not employed. The officer's choice to end Sam's life was not inevitable.   

MAY 30

  • photo by Jack Storms

    John T. Williams was a seventh-generation woodcarver of the Nuu-chah-nulth First Nation. On August 30, 2010, a Seattle police officer saw him walking across a street in downtown Seattle holding a small pocket knife, which was later found to be closed at the time. The officer shouted "Hey! Put the knife down!" and less than five seconds after the first "Hey," the officer shot him dead. 

  • Stoney Chiefstick was killed in a crowd gathered for a fireworks celebration on July 3, 2019, in Poulsbo, Washington. The officer who killed him made no effort at all to de-escalate and instead rushed him and killed him. There was no conversation, no effort to move the crowd, no use of alternatives. He was alleged to have had a screwdriver. Stoney Chiefstick’s death was unnecessary.  

MAY 31

  • photo by Jack Storms

    Renee Davis was killed in her own bed in October of 2016 by two King County deputies. Those deputies were called for a welfare check and were there to make sure she was safe during a mental health crisis, yet they killed her in the presence of her children. The officers had their guns out before approaching her door, did not de-escalate, take time, or secure the safety of anyone involved before they kicked her bedroom door open and killed her. The officers’ actions were found reasonable.   

  • Cecil Lacy Jr. was killed September 2015 by a Snohomish County Sheriff Deputy and Tulalip tribal police. He was walking, unarmed, committing no crime, having no criminal history. He died from asphyxia while prone, cuffed, with the deputy sheriff on his back. Cecil’s last words were “I CAN’T BREATHE.” Cecil was killed on his own reservation. Cecil left three kids, a wife, mother, grandchildren.   
  • Daniel Covarrubias was killed in Lakewood in April 2015, holding a cell phone when he was killed and the officers took no effort to use de-escalation tactics. He was in a mental health crisis. He was killed within seconds of officers arriving on the scene. The shooting was deemed justified by the department. 

JUNE 1

  • Jackie Salyers was killed by Tacoma Police Department, the officers shooting at the vehicle she was allegedly driving towards them, claiming their lives were in danger. This death and cover up in early 2016 illustrates the failures of police investigating police, and the disregard for Native Americans. Native Americans have the highest rate of fatal encounters with police.   
  • Bennie Branch was checking on his mother who was living in her vehicle at the time, when Bennie was shot and killed by Tacoma Police Department. This shooting in September 2019 has so many facts in dispute, it needs an independent investigation, and a jury to weigh these facts. Bennie was unarmed and shot in his back while running away.

JUNE 2

  • Leonard Thomas was unarmed, holding his son, when a SWAT sniper shot him in Fife Washington on the porch of his home in 2013. Three of the officers involved in killing Leonard were found civilly liable in federal court and a jury found that their egregious actions were directly responsible for Leonard’s unnecessary death. All three of these officers have been promoted and still have their badges and jobs. 
  • Said Joquin was killed during a Lakewood traffic stop in 2020 by one of the same officers who had been found responsible for the wrongful death of Leonard Thomas seven years earlier. Said was suspected of rolling through a stop sign. Police justified the killing by claiming he had "lowered his hands" after being ordered to keep them in air. The man who was in the passenger seat during the killing says that this is a lie. Officer Mike Wiley should have been removed from the police force after his misconduct in 2013. 

JUNE 3

  • Jesse Sarey was killed in Auburn, WA, on May 31, 2019 by Officer Jeff Nelson, who had multiple complaints of excessive force. Jesse was the third person he killed. The King County prosecutor has filed second degree murder and first degree assault charges and the officer was arrested. Jesse was only 25 years old.
  • Isaiah Obet was, according to claims made by the police, attempting to commit a carjacking in June of 2017, armed with a small knife. Officer Jeff Nelson arrived, ordered his police dog to attack, and shot Isaiah in the chest. While lying on the ground, having been mauled by a dog and with a bullet already in his chest, Isaiah posed no threat. Nevertheless, Officer Nelson stood over Isaiah and fired a second shot directly into his head. The Auburn Police Department awarded Officer Nelson its Medal of Valor for thwarting the carjacking. The City of Auburn settled a lawsuit brought by Isaiah's family for $1.25 million.
  • Brian Scaman was the first of the three people shot by Auburn Police Officer Jeff Nelson, killed during a traffic stop in 2011. The officer claimed that he was being attacked, and yet Scaman was shot in the back of the head.

JUNE 4

  • Enosa “EJ” Strickland was shot by Auburn police in May 2019 while waiting with police for a ride to pick him up. No crime had been committed. According to the police, Strickland allegedly obtained a knife belonging to one of the officers, although it remains unclear how that happened. The officers  claim they were unable to deescalate or restrain EJ, and instead fired a single shot into the back of his head.  
  • Giovonn Joseph McDade was killed in Kent in a traffic stop in June 2017. He was not committing a crime and was unarmed when he was killed. The vehicular pursuit was unnecessary. He was 20 years old. An officer standing beside Giovonn’s car shot him twice.   

JUNE 5

  • Matthew Folden was killed in Wenatchee in a grocery store parking lot in July 2017. Matt was agitated and is alleged to have threatened people with a pocket knife. He was killed within 13 seconds of the police arriving on the scene. Matt was 31 years old, had a history of drug use and co-occurring mental health issues, was a local musician and tattoo artist, and was a father and part of a loving family.
  • Patrick West was a loving husband, father, son, brother, and friend who suffered from bipolar disorder. Police were called to his home in Montesano in April 2019 for a welfare check when he was experiencing a mental health crisis. Patrick was alone in his own home and had not committed any crime. The local police activated a multi-jurisdictional tactical response team, which surrounded his home with armed officers, snipers, and an armored vehicle.  Patrick was shot in the back and shoulder after tactical officers breached the door to his home with a battering ram. He was holding a piece of steel from his workshop.

JUNE 6

  • Ryan Smith was killed in May 2019 after his girlfriend called 911 saying, "He needs help." Rather than providing help, police broke the door down, and six second later he was shot 12 times, as his girlfriend yelled "do not shoot!" Seattle's Office of Police Accountability concluded both officers had acted in a "lawful and proper" manner. 
  • Damarius Butts was shot and killed by Seattle police following a report of an armed robbery at a downtown convenience store. Nineteen-year-old Butts and his 17-year-old sister reportedly stole doughnuts, chips and a 12-pack of beer, showing the clerk a handgun on the way out. According to police officers chased him, and a police officer was struck in the protective vest with a round. Butts died from multiple gunshot wounds. His family believes that have never found out what really happened.
  • Che Taylor was given conflicting demands by Seattle Police, and he had his hands up when they shot him and left him to bleed to death. He was unarmed. Che was killed in February 2016, and his brother and sister founded Not This Time to advocate for other families facing the difficulties of navigating the system after a police-involved shooting.   
  • Shaun Fuhr was holding his child and running away from police when he was killed in Seattle in April 2020. It appears that deadly force was not necessary and it was used in a reckless and indifferent manner. There were other alternatives that day that would have kept Shaun alive. 

JUNE 7

  • Kevin Peterson Jr. was shot in the back in October 2020, while running away from Clark County Deputies. Kevin was 21 years old. He did not fire a single shot, yet police claimed he fired first, and immediately posted this misinformation on their website. Officers included these lies in their report. Kevin’s life mattered, and the truth matters.   
  • Carlos Hunter was shot and killed in March 2019 while seat belted in his car, dragged to the ground, handcuffed. He was left to bleed to death. The police use the traffic stop to serve a warrant; and the police found no evidence of a crime in their search of his home or car. Carlos was the third Vancouver, Washington resident killed in a three-week stretch. 
  • Clando Anitok was killed in January 2020 in Spokane after an officer attempted to stop him for a missing headlight. A traffic stop turned into a car chase. The officer claims he attempted to use a Taser, but it "malfunctioned." Clando was unarmed. He was shot once in the head.

JUNE 8

  • Juan Rene Hummel was killed in July of 2020 after policed received a call reporting someone slashing tires. (It remains unclear whether Juan or anyone else was actually slashing tires.) He was killed within seconds of encountering the officer. He was 25 years old.
  • Clayton Joseph was 16 years old when he was shot and killed in Vancouver, WA, in February 2019. He was holding a knife at the time. Non-lethal means of stopping him were not attempted.
  • Oscar Perez Giron was killed by a King County Sheriff’s deputy after being removed from a Sound Transit light rail train for failing to pay fare in June 2014. Police claim he pointed a handgun at the police, but his family disputes this version of events.
  • Michael Pierce was killed in February 2019 in Vancouver, WA, while holding what police believed were handguns. The guns turned out to be fake—the officers were never actually in danger. He had been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and was living on the street.

COVID Vaccine Clinic in the Cathedral Nave (or Parking Lot)

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UPDATE: The June 24 clinic has been cancelled. Please check back for further updates. 


At some appointments, your vaccine will be accompanied by live music on the Flentrop organ.

Saint Mark's is thrilled to be opening our doors to host a series of COVID-19 vaccine clinics in the sacred space of the cathedral nave, beginning this Thursday, April 29!

This clinic is offered in partnership with 6M Geriatrics and Hospital Medicine, a clinic located on First Hill.

At this time, the vaccine clinic will be in the cathedral nave at the times listed below. (Note that the registration links below do not explicitly list the location as Saint Mark's, but be assured that all 6M clinics at the following times are at the cathedral. Be sure to scroll down to see all the available slots.)

  • THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 9 A.M.–3:45 P.M.
  • WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, 4 P.M.–8 P.M.
  • THURSDAY, MAY 6, 9 A.M.–3:45 P.M.
  • WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 4 P.M.–8 P.M.
  • THURSDAY, MAY 13, 9 A.M.–3:45 P.M.
  • THURSDAY, MAY 20, 9 A.M.–3:45 P.M.
  • THURSDAY, MAY 27, 9 A.M.–3:45 P.M.
  • THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 9 A.M.–3:45 P.M.
  • THURSDAY, JUNE 10, 9 A.M.–1 P.M. (note new hours)
  • THURSDAY, JUNE 17, 9 A.M.–1 P.M. 
  • THURSDAY, JUNE 24, 9 A.M.–1 P.M. 

Stay tuned as additional times are added. New times will appear here as they become available. The Wednesday evening clinics are "drive-thru" in the cathedral parking lot.

Making a reservation in advance is strongly recommended. IF there are spaces and vaccine doses available, walk-up appointments may also be possible.

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Creation Care: Carbon Tracker Training

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UPDATE: A Complete video of the presentation is now available below.

Written instructions are available here.

For help navigating the video above, please refer to this video timeline, or click "view on youtube" and refer to the chapters in the video description.

THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 7-8:30 P.M., via Zoom

Saint Mark’s Cathedral has the bold goal of achieving a net-zero carbon footprint by the year 2030 – both for its facilities and for its congregation. We have encouraged our members to use the carbon tracker adopted by the Episcopal Church at www.sustainislandhome.org to measure your carbon footprint, and the St. Mark’s community group on the site now includes 66 households - that’s great! Now we have an opportunity to learn more about this tool to reduce our carbon footprint, save money, and have fun doing this together as a community. Thursday evening, June 3 from 7-8:30pm we will have the developer of SustainIslandHome, Lisa Altieri, with us for a training on the tool – how to explore the site more to find ways that we can reduce our household carbon footprints. If your household isn’t signed up yet, there will be an opportunity to do that, as well. Join us via Zoom on June 3 to help Saint Mark’s achieve a net-zero carbon footprint together as a community. Register to attend here.

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¡Encuentro! Meet People in El Salvador and Hear about the Work on for LGBTQ Rights and Safety

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¡Encuentro! Meet Each Other!
Meet People in El Salvador (via Zoom) and Hear First-Hand Their Stories—and Stories from four Saint Mark’s Folks, too!

SATURDAY, JUNE 5, 2:30–4:30 P.M. via Zoom: email Canon Nancy Ross for link: nross@saintmarks.org

Meet people and hear first-hand their stories of living in El Salvador, and hear the personal stories from four Saint Mark’s community members, too, for mutual sharing, as we kick-off Pride Month together with an Encuentro (gathering to get to know each other). It’s a chance for us to learn more about the situation in El Salvador, where many members of the migrant community in U.S. come from, and to hear about the Diocese of El Salvador’s work to advance LGBTQ+ rights, as we celebrate individuals’ stories and share in solidarity with LGBTQ+ members. Saint Mark’s is a supporter of the Anglican Church of El Salvador’s Santa Marta Center project, to offer shelter and services for LQBTQ+ youth and young adults, many of whom have been kicked out of their homes or deported. The Anglican Church of El Salvador is one of the few open and affirming churches in a region that has historically been (and continues to be) very hostile to LGBTQ+ people. Let’s meet each other with gratitude for this chance to begin an ongoing relationship. Email Canon Nancy Ross for the link: nross@saintmarks.org.

Compline on the 7th Sunday of Easter, 2021

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Compline on The 7th Sunday of Easter (The Sunday after Ascension) | May 16, 2021, 9:30 p.m.

See the Order of Service in Eastertide here. Each week's repertoire can be found here.

LEAFLETS

  • The Service Leaflet contains all you need to fully participate in each liturgy from home.

COFFEE HOUR

  • Virtual Coffee Hour: Immediately following the Sunday morning service, everyone is welcome to gather in a Virtual Coffee Hour over Zoom. Join using this link.
  • Monthly Newcomers Coffee (first Sunday of every month only): Immediately following the Sunday morning service, come meet people and ask questions at a special virtual coffee hour with clergy over Zoom. Join using this link. The next offering will be Sunday, June 6.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Limited in-person worship has now resumed. You must register in advance to attend in person. Read more, including how to register for an upcoming service, here.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Looking for the Livestream video archive? It now has its own page here

Music Series: All Bach on the Flentrop 2021

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Music Series: All-Bach on the Flentrop | Friday, May 14, 7:30 p.m.

Concert Program  |  Direct Vimeo link


Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

CDC Shifts and Masks at Church

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Dear friends,

Yesterday’s statement from the CDC announcing that masking and distancing would no longer be necessary for those who are vaccinated comes as a breath of good news. It bears hope on the wind around us that maybe we are approaching an end to the pandemic, and it encourages everyone to be vaccinated against the coronavirus. In effecting this change, the CDC looked to science and the small risk of infection and transmission that persists for those who are vaccinated while also leaving room for states, local public health officials, and businesses and venues to decide when and how to implement changes to current policies. I am glad for this, but I also know it will create some confusion.

Bishop Rickel, on the call with clergy yesterday, exhorted us not to abandon masks and distancing in worship just yet. I agree with him, and so, while we are looking to a new horizon when relaxation of those requirements may occur, we are not there yet. If you come to church, you will be required to continue to wear your mask and follow the safety guidelines.

You may say, “But the CDC said I don’t have to wear a mask…” That is the headline, but not the full story, and not everyone who attends worship at Saint Mark’s is vaccinated. I know you are tired of this; I am, too. We are not wearing the mask for ourselves, but for those around us, and the disease is still very dangerous, even deadly, for those as yet unvaccinated, including our children. Wearing the mask still in public worship is about serving others—or to place it in our covenantal context—it is about seeking and serving Christ in others, and loving your neighbor as yourself.

Governor Inslee has identified the end of June as a potential date on which we, as a society, may lift many restrictions. We will reevaluate when there is new local direction. We will find our way as a community. This means there are exciting developments to consider at Saint Mark’s—the return of other liturgies, the gathering of ministry groups at the cathedral, and the return of community groups who use the cathedral as a place of meeting as well. I want to assure you that the cathedral leadership and staff are well along in planning for those eventualities, with a keen eye to everyone’s safety.

So, for now, you will still need to register to attend worship, as we have since mid-March. There is room for more—no need to stay away, there is room for YOU! And when you are here, look around you and see who else is there, and know you wear the mask for them, for just a little longer. Look at those leading worship, and know they are striving to do “this” the best they know how, and with deep care and concern for you. I’m asking you to bear it all with grace and good humor. A new horizon is approaching, and we’ve come this far. Let’s press on, shall we? Thank you.

Faithfully yours,

The Very Rev. Steven L. Thomason
Dean and Rector

 

Pentecost “Way of Love” Revival Weekend

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The Episcopal Church greets Pentecost with One in the Spirit, a Way of Love Revival Weekend designed to fan the flames of hope, celebrate difference, honor creation, foster beloved community, and send people toward Jesus’s Way of Love. At 1 p.m. on the Feast of Pentecost itself—Sunday, May 23—a special worship service will be streamed, featuring elements submitted by a number of Episcopal institutions, including Saint Mark's.

SUNDAY, MAY 23, 1 P.M., streaming here as well as on the cathedral's website

Revival Worship Service (Featuring Contributions from Saint Mark's)

The entire Episcopal Church is invited to a virtual Pentecost Way of Love Revival Worship Service on Sunday, May 23, at 4 p.m. Eastern, 1 p.m. Pacific. The spirit-filled celebration will draw on the gifts, testimonies, songs and voices of Episcopalians in cathedrals and communities across the church. Saint Mark's was honored to be one of the few communities invited to contribute to this liturgy, along with indigenous churches in Navajoland and South Dakota, Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral, Washington National Cathedral, and Christ Church Cathedral in St. Louis, MO. The Pentecost Way of Love Revival Worship Service will be aired on the Episcopal Church’s various web channels, including Facebook and episcopalchurch.org, in addition to Saint Mark's own livestream page.

The weekend also includes two additional offerings:

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Creation Care Connect: A Conversation with Elizabeth Hawkins in El Salvador

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MONDAY, MAY 24, 6 P.M., via Zoom

 

THE CREATION CARE MINISTRY & 20s/30s GROUP PRESENTS:

Creation Care Connect: A Conversation with Elizabeth Hawkins in El Salvador

All are welcome to join in a conversation with Elizabeth Hawkins, a cathedral community member who has been living and working in San Salvador since 2019. She will share her perspectives with a Creation Care focus from her view living in El Salvador. Join using this Zoom link.

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Compline on the Sixth Sunday of Easter, 2021

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Compline on The Sixth Sunday of Easter | May 9, 2021, 9:30 p.m.

See the Order of Service in Eastertide here. Each week's repertoire can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral. You may make a contribution online at saintmarks.org/give (link opens in new tab). You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

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