The Third Sunday in Lent, 2022

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LEAFLETS

  • The Service Leaflet contains all you need to fully participate in each liturgy from home.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Lenten Ingathering for Mary’s Place

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On three Sundays—March 20, March 27, and April 3, 2022—Saint Mark's is gathering needed supplies for Mary's Place. Please bring your donations of disposable diapers (any size), baby wipes, travel-sized toiletries, or deodorant and place them in the large wicker baskets in the Coffee Corner, and they will be delivered to families at Mary's Place.

Learn more about the work of Mary's Place here.

Knowing God Through the Body: Justice, Liberation, and Fullness of Life

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UPDATED WITH VIDEO

TWO WEDNESDAYS, MARCH 23 & 30, 6:45–8:15 P.M., in person in Bloedel Hall or online via Zoom

A Forum with The Rev. Linzi Stahlecker

Over the course of this two-week series, Rev. Linzi will explore embodiment as a way to come to know and love ourselves, each other, and God more fully; discussing together why this is essential for the mission of the Church. Drawing from interdisciplinary thinkers, Scripture, and spiritual practice, Rev. Linzi will frame this series in her own life experience, participants are encouraged to notice parallels and differences from their own social location and life story.

Rev. Linzi hopes you will join her in Bloedel Hall—the series will be hybrid and you are also welcome to join via Zoom.


The slides from Part 1 may be seen here.

The slides from Part 2 may be seen here.

Video of both parts may be seen below:

“Choir Unvested”: An Evening of Music and Refreshment with the Evensong Choir

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SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 7:30 P.M., Bloedel Hall or join in via livestream

Join the adults, teens, and kids of the Saint Mark's Evensong Choir for CHOIR UNVESTED, an evening of brilliant entertainment, gourmet desserts, and a silent auction. Enjoy delicious treats by Chef Marc Aubertin and refreshing beverages as you listen to the members of the choir sing favorites from The Sound of Music, Godspell, Pippin, and other Broadway gems.

Choir Unvested is a fundraiser for the choir's upcoming pilgrimage to Chichester and Bristol Cathedrals, England, where they will serve as choir-in-residence for one week each in August. Funds are being raised to ensure that all the members can participate regardless of their ability to pay.

Tickets are $75 (plus a processing fee), $50 of which is tax deductible. Proof of vaccination/recent negative COVID test will be checked at the door. Purchase tickets here

To join online, purchase a ticket and a URL will be sent to you with your confirmation.


For a taste of what's in store at Saturday's UNVESTED cabaret fundraiser, check out this moment from a recent rehearsal, led by the cabaret's director and choreographer Heather MacLaughlin Garbes, featuring Evensong Choir countertenor John Garlid as Pippin (a role he seems to have been born to play!):

Special Parish Forum—St. Nicholas Redevelopment Report

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SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2022, 6:30-8 P.M. (note evening time!), in Bloedel Hall or via Zoom

The St. Nicholas Exploratory Committee has completed 18 months of study and reported its recommendations to the Vestry, which has received the report and adopted those recommendations. Next step is to report to the cathedral parish. Committee members will do so in a special forum to which all are invited.

Final Report of St. Nicholas Exploratory Committee

UPDATE: The slides from this presentation can be found here

A complete video of the forum is posted below:


A MESSAGE FROM DEAN THOMASON (MARCH 17, 2022)

There will be a Special Parish Forum on Sunday March 27, 2022, 6:30–8 p.m. in which the St. Nicholas Exploratory Committee will present its report to the parish along with recommendations it has made to the vestry. All are encouraged to attend, either in-person in Bloedel Hall, or via Zoom. The committee was established in Fall 2020 and charged by the vestry to explore the highest and best long-term use of the St. Nicholas property.

Several potential development approaches were considered, and the committee’s report can be viewed here. Committee members will be on hand to present key findings and recommendations, which have been adopted by the vestry, and to answer questions parishioners may have. We will also discuss next steps for potential campus development. All are welcome. Questions should be addressed to Dean Steve Thomason or Committee Chair John Hoerster.

Gratefully yours,

The Very Reverend Steven L. Thomason
Dean and Rector


See earlier update from this ongoing proce

 

Compline on the Second Sunday in Lent, 2022

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Compline on the Second Sunday in Lent | March 13, 2022, 9:30 p.m.

Order of Service in Lent   |  Each week's repertoire is posted here

The Order of Service and repertoire may be found at:

https://complineunderground.wordpress.com/2022/03/13/compline-2022-the-second-sunday-in-lent/

March 13, 2022 • The Second Sunday in Lent

ORISON: Reminiscere miserationum tuarum – Plainsong, Mode IV

PSALM 27:10-18 – Plainsong, Tone VIII.1

HYMN: Eternal light, shine in my heart (Tune: ACH BLEIB BEI UNS) – mel. Samuel Scheidt (1587-1654); harm. Seth Calvisius (1556-1615)

NUNC DIMITTIS – Plainsong setting, Tone IV.2

ANTHEM: Lamentations of Jeremiah – Jacob Handl (1550-1591)

 

Jason Anderson, director • Gregory Bloch, reader • Jeremy Matheis, cantor

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Compline is now open to all for in-person attendance.
  • Starting March 14, 2022, masks are optional inside the cathedral. The south section of seating is reserved for those who wish to remain masked and distanced from others. Learn more here.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Worship Update: Lifting the Mask Mandate (March 7, 2022)

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UPDATE MAY 12, 2022: THE REQUIREMENT TO WEAR MASKS WHILE INDOORS IS RE-INSTITUTED AS OF MAY 15, 2022. 

THE OUT-OF-DATE INFORMATION BELOW IS FOR HISTORICAL INFORMATION ONLY

 


MARCH 7, 2022

Dean Thomason has prepared this brief (5-minute) video message, regarding changes in mask policies that will go into effect at the cathedral on Sunday, March 13. A written version of this message appears below.

Please watch, and email the Dean at sthomason@saintmarks.org with any questions you may have.

Dear friends,

As you surely know, beginning March 12 (per Governor Inslee and King County Public Health), the mask mandate for indoor gatherings generally—and houses of worship specifically—are lifted, subject to restoration if infection rates rise and warrant that.

Given these changes, Saint Mark’s Cathedral will adopt the same practice, effective Sunday March 13, 2022, but with a few important safeguards to ensure that we preserve space for all to feel welcome. Please note these details and help us hold the space for all to feel welcome:

  • The south pews and additional chairs in the south transept remain “masked only” for the protection of small children and others for whom that protection is important.
  • Folks seated in the northern (undistanced) sections can mask or not, their choice, but they cannot guarantee that others around them will be masked.
  • Vested ministers and ushers also have the choice to mask or not; however, when they are serving in the narthex or in the “masked only” (south) sections, they will wear masks.
  • All ministers distributing communion will mask at the communion stations for bread and wine.
  • Choirs—all are vaccinated and can remove their masks (or not, as they choose) when singing in north sections of the nave or the gallery. They will mask during procession through the nave.
  • We continue to livestream the 11 a.m. Eucharist and 9:30 p.m. Compline services each Sunday, Choral Evensong the first Sunday of the month at 4:30pm, and other special services. This remains a viable way of connecting to the community and worshipping as part of it.

A few more details regarding other gatherings and spaces:

  • Thomsen Chapel services. The mask mandate is lifted, but individuals are welcome to continue to mask. We have programmed the HVAC system to ventilate the space well before, during, and after every service.
  • Church Office. The mask mandate is lifted March 12, but anyone is welcome to continue wearing their mask, and any parishioner visiting a staff member is welcome to ask that masks be worn while meeting.
  • Ministry groups. If children under five are present, all should remain masked.
  • Ministry groups. If no children under five are present, the group that gathers should confer and gain consensus on masking. It is my hope that groups will be considerate of the concerns we bring into such spaces. It may be that one has a newborn relative, or an immunocompromised member of their household whose well-being prompts them to seek a more cautious path.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly: If you have any symptoms, stay home and test! This move to relax precautions will only succeed if we all seek to serve the common good. So if you have symptoms, please stay home.

Of course, it is also likely that a new variant or another surge may prompt the return of mask mandates, but for now we make this turn with a deep desire to be together, to see each other’s faces, and to forge community in life-giving ways. I am grateful for your part in that.

Blessings and peace,

The Very Reverend Steven L. Thomason
Dean and Rector

Compline on the First Sunday in Lent, 2022

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Compline on the First Sunday in Lent | March 6, 2022, 9:30 p.m.

Order of Service in Lent   |  Each week's repertoire is posted here

The Order of Service and repertoire may be found at:

https://complineunderground.wordpress.com/2022/03/06/compline-2022-the-first-sunday-in-lent/

March 6, 2022 • The First Sunday in Lent

ORISON: Invocabit me – Plainsong, Mode VIII

PSALM 91 – Plainsong, Tone IV.4

HYMN: Lord, who throughout these forty days (Tune: SAINT FLAVIAN) – mel. from Day’s Psalter, 1562; harm. Richard Redhead (1820-1901) and Giles Farnaby (c. 1563-1640), adapt.

NUNC DIMITTIS – Plainsong setting, Tone IV.2

ANTHEM: In jejunio et fletu – Thomas Tallis (c. 1505-1585)

Jason Anderson, director • David Gary, reader • Thomas Adams, cantor

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Compline is now open to all for in-person attendance.
  • Starting March 14, 2022, masks are optional inside the cathedral. The south section of seating is reserved for those who wish to remain masked and distanced from others. Learn more here.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Resuming the Common Cup

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MARCH 3, 2022

Dean Thomason has prepared this brief (~2-minute) video message, announcing that the cathedral will resume offering the cup of wine to the entire congregation at the time of Holy Communion, on a strictly optional basis, beginning this Sunday, March 6, 2022.

Please watch, and email the Dean at sthomason@saintmarks.org with any questions you may have.

Blood Memory and Spiritual Inheritance: A Forum with The Rev. Dr. Hillary Raining

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(Click to enlarge)

UPDATED WITH VIDEO

TWO WEDNESDAYS, MARCH 9 & 16, 2022, 6:45–8:15 P.M. PACFIC TIME, via Zoom only, registration required. 

In the last few years, scientists have discovered what indigenous communities have known for countless generations: that the emotional and physical lives of our ancestors will fundamentally affect our emotional and physical lives as well. Yet, this concept of generational spirituality is underexplored in our faith communities. In this two part series, The Rev. Dr. Hillary Raining, Saint Mark’s 2022 Theologian-in-Residence, will explore the role of our ancestors in shaping our lives as well as how we might help heal ourselves and others. Join us for a combination of scholarship and experience in community!

Participants are invited to read Rev. Raining’s article on spiritual inheritance and gratitude here. Learn more about Rev. Raining here.


SPIRITUAL GENOGRAM

Rev. Raining has invited participants to construct their own "Spiritual Genogram" before the second session on March 16. Here some resources to guide you:

The Spiritual Genogram Participant Handout

Spiritual Genograms

Standard Genogram Symbols

Genogram Relationship Symbols

 

A complete video of Part 1:

A complete video of Part 2:

A Lenten Quiet Morning at Saint Mark’s, 2022

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SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 2022, 9 A.M.–12:30 P.M., at Saint Mark’s Cathedral

This gathering is open to all and free. The morning is designed to help us move deeply into the sacred seasons with morning prayer, centering prayer, walking meditation, and unstructured time for reflection held in shared silence. Freewill donations gratefully accepted ($10–15 suggested). For more information, contact Canon Wendy Claire Barrie.

“Lent is a Good Time for Life Planning Work”—A Message from Dean Thomason

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MARCH 2, 2022 (ASH WEDNESDAY)

Dear friends,

For Christians, the Season of Lent offers a certain wisdom—that death is understood not merely as an event that occurs at the end of life, but also as an ever-present character in the story of our lives. Death is a mystery to be contemplated while we live.

For the past few years, I’ve made an annual appeal at the beginning of Lent for each adult at Saint Mark’s to undertake the work of planning your own funeral. Scores of people have done so; many have expressed how deeply meaningful this work is. If you have done so already, take time this Lent to dust off your plan, review and update it if needed. If you’ve not yet taken this work on, I exhort you to include this work this year in your observance of a holy Lent. It is indeed holy work. The clergy are happy to assist you in any way you find helpful.
Here are the documents that will serve as resources for you:

These documents are also available at saintmarks.org/funeral. Ideally, you would complete this planning form (or as much as you’d like to complete) and provide a copy to the Dean’s office, where it will be kept on file, and held in confidence, until the time it is needed (hopefully a long time from now!) Of course, you can retrieve it, amend it, or replace it at any time (and many of us do).

This year, I want to broaden this invitation to include preparation (or review) of your will. My granddaughter was born earlier this year, and her birth has prompted my daughter and her wife to prepare their wills. They are in their 30s; Kathy and I did much the same when our first child was born. It is never too soon to give thought to that part of end-of-life planning, including provision for heirs and designating legacy gifts for charitable agencies to which you are committed. Again, Lent is a particularly poignant time to undertake this work, or to conduct an annual review of your estate documents. For some with complex estates, an attorney will be needed. For others, this can be a straightforward exercise, and the Cathedral Foundation and the Diocese of Olympia have partnered with Freewill, a free online resource designed to help guide your decisions around estate planning and will preparation.

Kathy and I rewrote our wills a few years ago—maybe the fifth time in our lives—and we will review them again this Lent as a spiritual practice that evokes gratitude—for the blessings in our lives, for our children, and for Saint Mark’s, our alma maters, and other organizations we want to support with planned gifts.

This is holy work, my friends, wherever you are on the spiritual journey of life, wherever you are in the course of life. I hope you will embrace it as part of your Lenten observance.

Blessings and peace,

The Very Reverend Steven L. Thomason
Dean and Rector

Closing of the Doors on Shrove Tuesday, 2022

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Closing of the Doors on Shrove Tuesday | March 1, 2022, 7 p.m. 

A one-minute video of the moment of the closing of the great doors may be seen below:

LEAFLETS

  • The Service Leaflet contains all you need to fully participate in each liturgy from home.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Treasures of the Cathedral: Virginia Maksymowicz’s Stations of the Cross

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2022 marks the fifth year that the Stations of the Cross by artist Virginia Maksymowicz have been displayed in the nave of Saint Mark's Cathedral, Seattle. Although they were originally commissioned by St Thomas Episcopal Church in Lancaster, PA—a very different kind of church interior than Saint Mark's—their elemental quality and stark appearance resonate visually and spiritually with the nave of Saint Mark's. Many are surprised to learn that they were not created specifically for this space! In fact, they have only been on loan to the cathedral since their first appearance here in 2018.

Now, Saint Mark's Cathedral is happy to announce that these artworks are now a permanent part of the cathedral collection. They have been given as a gift by The Rt. Rev. Gregory Rickel, Bishop of Olympia, and Mrs Marti Rickel, to the glory of God and in loving memory of Bishop Rickel's father, Morris E. Rickel Jr. These Stations of the Cross will serve the cathedral community, the diocese, and wider community as a beautiful and prayerful aspect of our Lenten observances for years to come.


About the Stations of the Cross

Religious imagery depicting Jesus' journey to Golgotha and the tomb dates back to the 13th century. The artistic tradition began as a way to replicate the experience of pilgrims in Jerusalem, who would walked the Via Dolorosa—traditionally believed to be the route Christ walked in final hours—pausing at prescribed "stations" to reflect and pray. For her interpretation, Maksymowicz worked with a variety of models, culled from a wide range of ages and ethnicities. She explains, "I wanted the narrative of Christ’s passion and death to be represented in a way that is tensioned between the 'specific' and the 'universal.'"

Read a statement and a journal article by the artist.

Read the article in the Episcopal Journal about the Stations.

Check out the feature in Saint Mark's quarterly magazine, The Rubric.


Stations of the Cross Liturgies

At this time two communal liturgies engaging with The Stations of the Cross are planned for Holy Week 2022:

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 5:30 P.M. (following Evensong)

Youth Stations event with Bishop Rickel. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 9, 10 A.M.

20s/30s Stations of the Cross Event

PALM SUNDAY: APRIL 10, 2022, following the 11 a.m. service (approx. 12:15 p.m)

Bilingual Stations of the Cross Liturgy in Spanish and English. 

GOOD FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2022, 11 a.m.

Stations of the Cross Liturgy 

Additional liturgies may be announced; please stay tuned.


The Way of the Cross: A Liturgy on Film

In March of 2020, just after the closure of the building due to the pandemic, a team at Saint Mark's led by filmmaker David Wild created this video liturgy, showcasing the Stations in the context of the "Way of the Cross" liturgy from The Book of Occasional Services:

Coffee with the Curate!

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SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 10:10–10:50 A.M., Bloedel Hall or via Zoom

Rev. Linzi, the newest member of Saint Mark’s clergy team, is excited for the opportunity to gather with the people of the parish for this Sunday forum - her spouse, Troy, will be here too. Linzi will share some of her surprising story, which begins as an outspoken and committed atheist living and working in London, England, and she will also introduce the Cathedral Commons she’ll be leading later this month. Learn more about Linzi here. Bring your coffee and your questions!

Join using this Zoom link.

Organ Meditation before Cathedral Yoga

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UPDATED WITH VIDEO

MONDAY, MARCH 14, 2022, 6–6:30 P.M., in the cathedral nave

On Monday, March 14, beginning at 6 p.m., Saint Mark's Associate Organist John Stuntebeck will offer 30 minutes of drone-based improvisations on the Mighty Flentrop, as an aid to reflection and meditation, and as a prelude to yoga practice. Cathedral Yoga, led by Sally Senger, will follow immediately at 6:30 p.m.

Arrive at any time between 6 and 6:30, but note that the nave will not be open until just before 6 p.m.

You are welcome to stay for the organ prelude without attending the yoga class.


UPDATE: The response to this offering was terrific, and additional Organ Meditations will be offered:

MONDAY, MAY 2, 6 P.M., and the first Monday of each month. (Note: No organ OR yoga class on July 4.)

A very brief taste of the event may be heard in the video below:

Compline on the Last Sunday after the Epiphany, 2022

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Compline on the Last Sunday after the Epiphany | February 27, 2022, 9:30 p.m.

Order of Service in Lent   |  Each week's repertoire is posted here

The Order of Service and repertoire may be found at:

https://complineunderground.wordpress.com/2022/02/27/compline-2022-the-eighth-sunday-after-the-epiphany/

February 27, 2022 • The Last Sunday after the Epiphany

ORISON: How bright appears the Morning Star (Tune: WIE SCHÖN LEUCHTET) – composite; arr. Gregory Bloch

PSALM 99 – Plainsong, Tone VII.7

HYMN: Christ upon the mountain peak (Tune: IBIS) – mel. Thomas Kuras (1950-1997); harm. Peter R. Hallock (1924-2014)

NUNC DIMITTIS – Plainsong, Tone I; harm. Thomas Morley (1557-1602)

ANTHEM: Resplenduit facies ejus – Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)

 

Jason Anderson, director • Joel Matter, reader • Kenneth Peterson, cantor

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Compline is open to all for in-person attendance as of August 22, 2021. Masks must be worn at all times.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

A Holy Thread: Lenten Reflection & Connection for 20s/30s

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SUNDAYS, MARCH 13, 20, & 27, 5:30–6:45 P.M., Leffler House (with the option to attend the 7 p.m. Contemplative Eucharist in Thomsen Chapel)

Are you drawn to contemplative reading and have a desire to reflect on content with others? Drawing from Listening for the Heartbeat of God by J. Philip Newell, we’ll weave in themes in the readings over the course of three Sundays for a time of spiritual reflection and connection. Participants are encouraged to read the book but it is not required. Co-facilitated by Victoria Szydlowski and Emily Meeks. If interested, please email Emily: (emcmeeks@gmail.com).

“Lenten Thoughts” by Doug Thorpe

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A birch leaf held fast
In limestone ten million years
Still quietly burns,
Though claimed by the darkness.

Let earth be this windfall
Swept to a handful of seeds—
One tree, one leaf,
Gives us plenty of light.

 

John Haines, The Owl in the Mask of the Dreamer: Collected Poems

Lent. The word derives from the Old English lencten meaning spring season, perhaps derived from a related root meaning long, connected to the lengthening of days. Or, perhaps, to just how long it can take for spring to arrive in the north. Think of the melting of icicles off gutters, which I remember best from my childhood on the edge of Chicago when I used to delight in eating them like popsicles. Lent is no longer winter exactly, but in northern climates it’s also not that burst of energy that we associate with Spring, even though the spring equinox often occurs during Lent. Still, it’s during this liturgical season that somewhere below the surface of the earth things are beginning to quicken. Life returning—time itself is in motion again.

The church calendar follows this seasonal calendar, at least here in the northern hemisphere. We move from the celebration of Mary’s pregnancy on March 25, close to the spring equinox, to the birth nine months later on December 25—winter solstice, as light begins to overtake the darkness. Then we move quickly from birth and baptism to the 40 days of desert wilderness, also echoing the Israelites’ 40 years of wandering: Lent, with that underground sense of something still unknown coming—a wind, a belief in buried seeds. And just as Joshua crosses over the Jordan River into the Promised Land, so does Jesus—whose name echoes Joshua’s—arrive at last back in Jerusalem, David’s city, the spiritual center of the Promised Land.

And then suddenly it all seems to end. And then it doesn’t.

We’re in motion and yet also circling, since we do it every year, all praise to The Book of Common Prayer. Each of us is a year older, so that we’re moving forward through time even while the liturgy circles, so that simultaneously we feel ourselves caught within a linear process, time moving inexorably ahead, even while we stand outside of time. We are, in Christ, in time and freed from time.

There is no better expression of this, in my opinion, than the experience of celebrating Eucharist even as we are observing Lent—and yes, right up through Good Friday. So there we are, caught in this linear sequence that leads us inevitably to the cross and death, and yet in the very midst of that we are celebrating again this meal with Jesus, who is very much with us—not simply as a memory, but somehow here, now, even as He is with Mary Magdalene at the tomb and with those disciples on the road to Emmaus.

Very paradoxical. My non-logical literary mind loves it.

So too with the idea of the Kingdom: we affirm it as a future apocalyptic reality (and we finish the New Testament in linear fashion with a vision of the descent of the “New Jerusalem” among us), even as we accept Christ’s proclamation of a Kingdom already here, around us, among us, within us.

Clearly this is a Kingdom rather unlike Rome’s, or indeed unlike David’s.

Seasons come, seasons pass. We have a journey before us only to discover that there is nowhere we need to go.

Consider the story that Belden Lane (the cathedral’s guest this coming April) retells from Niko Kazantzakis. A pious monk saves up all his life to make the great pilgrimage to Jerusalem, where he will approach the Holy Sepulcher at last, circle it in ritual fashion three times, and only then be ready to return home and be ready to die, a transformed man. At last he has the money for the trip and he sets off, leaving his monastery for the first time in decades. But no sooner has he left than he comes upon a poor beggar who asks the monk where he’s off to. “Jerusalem,” proudly says the monk.

“And you have saved enough for this trip?” asks the beggar.

“Yes indeed—I have it right here in my satchel.”

The beggar then describes his plight: a wife and young child at home, no work, no food; indeed, they are on the very edge of starvation. After a moment’s silence the beggar looks at the monk: would you consider, he says, giving me your money and then walking around me three times before returning to your monastery?

The monk returns the gaze of the beggar and then slowly opens his satchel, hands over his life’s savings, circles three times around the man—and yes, returns to the monastery ready to die, a transformed man.

Lent. Yes, we have a long journey ahead of us. And yet—where is there to get to? Jerusalem? The Holy Sepulcher? Sometimes yes, absolutely, we need to go on pilgrimage. But, the story reminds us, ultimately there is nowhere else we need to go to follow this Way, recognizing that Christ himself is right here, directly in front of us in a world in need of all we’ve been saving up. And so we circle that holiness—in the liturgy and in the love we give away to family, friends, strangers, the broken earth itself. We return home and live out our days transformed, moving with the seasons even as we live, as Blake put it, in eternity’s sunrise.

—Doug Thorpe, Creation Care Newsletter Editor 

Compline on the Seventh Sunday after the Epiphany, 2022

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Compline on the Seventh Sunday after the Epiphany | February 20, 2022, 9:30 p.m.

Order of Service  |  Each week's repertoire is posted here

The Order of Service and repertoire may be found at:

February 20, 2022 • The Seventh Sunday after the Epiphany

ORISON: ‘Beloved, let us love one another,’ from In Praise of Singing – Alice Parker (b. 1925)

PSALM 33:12-22 – Peter R. Hallock (1924-2014)

HYMN 577: God is love (Tune: UBI CARITAS [MURRAY]) – A. Gregory Murray (1905-1992)

NUNC DIMITTIS – Dana Marsh (b. 1965)

ANTHEM: Ubi caritas – Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986); arr. men’s voices by Jeff Junkinsmith (b. 1956)

 

Jason Anderson, director • J. Scott Kovacs, reader • Derek Tilton, cantor

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Compline is open to all for in-person attendance as of August 22, 2021. Masks must be worn at all times.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Intergenerational Hike to Tradition Lake

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2 P.M., meet at the Tradition Lake trailhead

For the second intergenerational hike, intrepid hiker Betsy Bell has chosen a route that’s friendly to seniors and preschoolers. We’ll meet at the Tradition Lake trailhead at the end of the road at High Point exit off I-90. This includes the Swamp Trail which has a fun series of story boards about Zoe and the creatures in the area, the Ruth Kees Big Tree and Tradition Lake trails, about 2.5 to 3 miles with almost no elevation gain and a couple of good places to stop for prayer and song.

See a map of the trail route here.

Check out photos and materials from the previous Intergenerational Hike to Twin Falls here.

Questions or RSVP to Canon Wendy Claire Barrie: wbarrie@saintmarks.org

Please note: If you are interested in going, please email Canon Wendy Barrie in advance, and she will reply with her cell phone number. 

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Compline on the Sixth Sunday after the Epiphany, 2022

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Compline on the Sixth Sunday after the Epiphany | February 13, 2022, 9:30 p.m.

Order of Service  |  Each week's repertoire is posted here

The Order of Service and repertoire may be found at:

February 13, 2022 • The Sixth Sunday after the Epiphany

ORISON: If ye love me – Thomas Tallis (c. 1505-1585)

PSALM 1 – Jason A. Anderson (b. 1976)

HYMN 656: Blest are the pure in heart (Tune: FRANCONIA) – Johann Balthasar König (1691-1758); adapt. and harm. William Henry Havergal (1793-1870)

NUNC DIMITTIS – Anonymous [No. 26], from The Lumley Books, c. 1547-1552

ANTHEM: Blessed be the Lord God – Erin Aas (b. 1972)

 

Jason Anderson, director • Josh Sandoz, reader • James Wilcox, cantor

IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE

  • Compline is open to all for in-person attendance as of August 22, 2021. Masks must be worn at all times.

OTHER WAYS TO WATCH

  • If you experience any problems with the video player on this page, you may wish to try joining the simultaneous stream on Facebook or YouTube instead.

NEWSLETTER

  • The weekly cathedral newsletter contains important announcements, offerings, and events. Click here to add yourself to cathedral emails lists.

ARCHIVES 

  • Video of past services can be seen here.
  • Audio and printed text of sermons can be found here.

Support the Mission and Ministry of Saint Mark's Cathedral

If you watch and enjoy our live-streamed or archived services, please consider making a donation in support of the mission and ministry of this cathedral.

You may also donate using the Venmo mobile app from your smartphone (search for @SaintMarksCathedralSeattle ) Thank you for your generosity.

Celtic Spirituality—A Two-Part Forum with Canon Jennifer King Daugherty

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BIBLIOGRAPHY
Esther de Waal, The Celtic Way of Prayer
John Phillip Newell, Listening for the Heartbeat of God
John Phillip Newell, Celtic Benediction: Morning and Night Prayer
David Adams, Borderlands
Michael Rodgers & Marcus Losack, Glendalough: A Celtic Pilgrimage
Thomas Cahill, How the Irish Saved Civilization
Alexander Carmichael, Carmina Gadelica
Philip Sheldrake, Living Between Worlds: Place and Journey in Celtic Spirituality
Alistair Maclean, Hebridean Altars

UPDATED WITH VIDEO

TWO WEDNESDAYS, FEBRUARY 16 & 23, 2022, 6:45 p.m.–8:15 p.m., in Bloedel Hall and via Zoom

An offering from The Wisdom School at Saint Mark's

Facilitated by Canon Jennifer King Daugherty

Join Canon Daugherty over the course of two Wednesday evenings to explore the riches of creation-based spirituality in the Celtic tradition. She’ll share some of what she learned while on sabbatical in Ireland and Iona, and we’ll practice rhythms of embodied prayer and openness to daily encounters with the holy. 


The pdf of scripture that was distributed at Part 1 may be found here: Celtic Prayers and Scripture Passages

The complete slides from Part 1 may be found here: Celtic Spirituality part 1 2.16.22

The complete slides from Part 2 may be found here: Celtic Spirituality Part 2 2.23.22

A video of parts 1 and 2 may be seen below:

Shrove Tuesday 2022

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TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 6–7:15 P.M., in the cathedral nave. Register here. Suggested donation: $5/person, $20/family.

Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper and Closing of the Doors

Please join us on Shrove Tuesday, March 1, in the cathedral nave, to end the season after Epiphany in the traditional way—by gathering in community, eating pancakes, and having fun! There will be live music, crafts, and games. Chef Marc Aubertin and the youth will be preparing our meal, and the members of the Seattle Service Corps will be decorating and assisting in the celebration.

The evening will conclude with a brief liturgy to bury the Alleluias and close the great doors until Easter. (This is a tradition to unique to Saint Mark's—see a glimpse of what the Closing of the Doors has looked like in previous years below!)

Please register in advance here. Children 5 and under are very much welcome! Everyone older than 5 must be vaccinated or provide a recent negative PCR test. When you register, you will be encouraged to provide your proof of vaccination in advance, simply by emailing an image to Canon Barrie at wbarrie@saintmarks.org

(Registration will also be available at the door, but advance registration will aid in planning, and providing proof of vaccination in advance will speed up check-in.)

The Closing of the Doors, 2019
The Closing of the Doors, 2020
(If the player above doesn't work, try this link.)
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