2021 St. Francis Day Outdoor Liturgy with Blessing of the Animals

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2021, 4:30 P.M., on the outdoor labyrinth and front lawn

On Saturday, October 2, Saint Mark's will once again offer its beloved Saint Francis Day tradition. A few years ago this offering was moved from Sunday morning to Saturday afternoon, and the outdoor celebration has a truly festive community atmosphere. Dogs, cats, bird, bunnies, ponies, chickens, and all creatures great and small are welcome!

The event will again feature contributions from acclaimed Seattle musician James Falzone, and this year, music will also be offered by the young choristers of Choir School. The service will include prayers for healing humanity’s relationship with the earth, and for all the creatures who share the earth with us. Following the service, animals can receive an individual blessing from a priest if desired.

All are invited to attend, with or without their animal companions. Stuffed animals are also welcome to be blessed, as are photographs of pets who would not find attending the event a blessed experience.

Animals should remain leashed or kenneled. Following current recommendations regarding outdoor events with crowds, all attendees must remain masked at all times, and are requested to maintain social distance as much as possible.

This service will be livestreamed.

Code Red For Humanity: Reflections on the IPCC Report 6th Assessment Report on Climate Change

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 7 P.M. via Zoom [link TBA]

The recent IPCC report shows that heating from humans has caused irreparable damage to Earth that could worsen in the years to come. Come learn about causes, potential impacts and response options while reflecting how we may find hope in our collective efforts for change.

Saint Mark's parishioner and American Geophysical Union president-elect Lisa Graumlich will lead us in making sense of these findings and explore how we may move forward with this information.

Join using this Zoom link.

Intergenerational Hike to Twin Falls

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2021,  2 –5:30 P.M.

Let’s hike together! All ages are welcome on this 3 mile roundtrip hike to Twin Falls as we take time to connect, move and pray in nature after church. We’ll meet at the trailhead at 2 p.m. and finish by 5:30 p.m. Bring your water, snacks and appropriate gear - we recommend good hiking shoes, layers, sunscreen and a hat.

Register to attend here!

Questions? Contact Emily Meeks (emcmeeks@gmail.com). 

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Special Parish Forum on the Statement of Lament and Commitment to Action

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UPDATE: This event has been postponed, and will be offered later in the Fall on a date TBA.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2021, 6:30–8 p.m.

Hybrid gathering: in Bloedel Hall and via Zoom (registration requested for either option so we can plan accordingly)

Earlier this year the Vestry unanimously adopted the Statement of Lament and Commitment to Action as a guide for our important work as individuals and community as we strive for justice and peace and respect for every human being. It is a substantial document with a broad range of statements leading to actionable ways we are called to live and act in the world. In the special parish forum, to which all are invited and encouraged to attend, we will reflect together, unpack the document, and break into groups which will focus on specific areas of work including

  1. Addressing Homeless and Hunger in Seattle,
  2. Cathedral innovations for Reparations,
  3. Racial Justice and Healing,
  4. Global Justice ministries,
  5. Immigration Ministries, and
  6. Networking with Affiliate Partners in Ministry.

Please register in advance using the form below, whether to plan to attend in person or online via Zoom. If you choose the online option, a Zoom link will be emailed to you directly in the days before the event.

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Holy Honey: A Cathedral Bees Update

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Honey from the cathedral beehives has been harvested! Thanks to beekeepers Rob and Penny Reid, with help from Jaime, Yoshi, and Keiko, who collected honey from the hives in the cathedral kitchen at the end of July 2021.

The honey is separated from the wax using a hand-cranked machine that spins the frames at high speeds.

The Cathedral Breadbakers Guild are now using our bees' honey in their loaves prepared for communion every Sunday. "Bee prepared" for honey to be sold in the nave, coming soon!

 

Click photos to enlarge.

Clean Cars 2030 Coalition Rally

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 12 P.M.

Co-hosted by Earth Ministry/Washington Interfaith Power & Light

Saint Mark’s is honored to host a Clean Cars 2030 Coalition rally sponsored by Coltura on Saturday, August 14 at 12 p.m. There will be music, art, food, speakers, and an EV parade and car show at this family-friendly outdoor event. Anyone who has an electric car is welcome to hop in the parade and you can meet in the parking lot at 10:30 a.m. to decorate. If you are able, bring your family by EV, bike, bus, or light rail to show your love for clean transportation! RSVP on Facebook here.

A Creation Care Reflection by Doug Thorpe

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by Doug Thorpe

June 21, 2021

In late May, an article in The  New York Review of Books tells me that “a national poll showed that 28 percent of Republicans agreed that ‘things have gotten so far off track, true American patriots may have to resort to violence in order to save our country.”  And what’s driving this fear and anger?  According to political scientist Robert A. Pape, the answer is “fear of the Great Replacement”—meaning, of course, that “minorities are progressively replacing white populations due to mass immigration policies and low birthrates.”

In short, racial grievances.

I’m reading this the day after attending—in person!—the cathedral’s 9 a.m. service, officiated by our friend and former Saint Mark’s staff member Malcolm McLaurin, the first African American man in this diocese to be ordained to the priesthood.

Which is good news—and also, of course, sobering news, given that this cathedral has stood for almost a century.

Well, we are a majority white congregation, and a majority white denomination. Which just means that we have to work harder to forge relationships across racial and ethnic boundaries, which we can do in part by sharing in work that crosses over.

For example:  Environmental Justice.

A small summertime example:  Bill McKibben tells us in his weekly New Yorker eblast that a ten-degree-Fahrenheit jump in temperature during the warm season was associated with an increase in emergency-room visits for “mental-health disorders, self-injury/suicide, and intentional injury/homicide.” Both these effects show up more strongly in this country in Black and Hispanic patients—probably, as Dr. Rupa Basu explained (She’s the chief of air-and-climate epidemiology at California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment), because those groups disproportionately live in low-income neighborhoods. “They’re often in areas where there are more fossil-fuel emissions, fewer green spaces, and more blacktop and cement, which really absorbs and retains the heat,” she said. “And also living closer to freeways. That exacerbates air pollution. And, with the heat, that’s a synergistic effect. It’s environmental racism that leads to these differences in exposure.” Some people, she added, bristle at hearing that: “Someone said to me, ‘Oh, so now we’re breathing different air?’ And I said, ‘Yes, that’s exactly right. We can track it down to the Zip Code level.’” Call it critical race epidemiology.

There are things we can do, and Saint Mark's is actively seeking for these large and small solutions. And so it was a small pleasure that, on the same day that our parish celebrated the calling and ordination of Malcolm, we also joined together in the cathedral parking lot and blessed—yes, blessed—the new charging station for electric cars. In doing so we honored the legacy of Jim Mulligan, one of the founders of Earth Ministry and a long term supporter of Creation Care at the cathedral.

As Jim’s widow Ruth said in her comments, Jim would surely have found the humor in the situation: I mean, putting a plaque on a charging station is not exactly like having your face carved on Mount Rushmore. But, as Ruth also said, Jim liked to work behind the scenes, quietly, and yes, with a good sense of humor.

And so there we were, gathered together in the parking lot on a warm June morning.  One small step, as one of our astronauts once said.  But it was a step that put him on the moon.  That’s where small steps can lead.


Longtime Saint Mark's parishioner and former vestry member Doug Thorpe is Professor Emeritus of English at Seattle Pacific University.

 

Ruth Muligan speaks at the E.V. charging station dedication, June 20, 2021.

Dean’s Message on Land Acknowledgment

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Dean Thomason sent the following message to the community regarding the creation and intention behind the cathedral's Land Acknowledgment. Much more information can be found at Saint Mark's Land Acknowledgment page.


A Message from Dean Thomason

Dear friends,
You may have noticed in recent months more occasions when we have begun our worship or meetings with a Land Acknowledgment:

Saint Mark’s Cathedral acknowledges that we gather on the traditional land of the first people of Seattle, the Duwamish People, who are still here, and we honor with gratitude the land itself and the life of the Duwamish Tribe. 

Over the last year a Vestry-appointed ad hoc group has worked to develop the Land Acknowledgment we are now using. It was adopted unanimously by the cathedral Vestry in April of this year, and every group at Saint Mark’s—every ministry, every gathering, every committee—is encouraged to begin your time together with this Land Acknowledgment. The Vestry is committed to this action and many more as we seek to deepen our relationship with and support for the Duwamish People. You can read more about that, and the process that led to this action, on the website, but I hope and expect you will embrace this work as well, with intention.

Words matter, and this is the work of justice to which we are called as a community of faith, and as individuals. If it feels awkward at first to say the words, as I suspect it might for some, I beseech you to press on, keep saying them, and remain open to the conversion that can happen when the words help form you into a new awareness.

In my conversation with Duwamish tribal chair (and descendent of Chief Seattle) Cecile Hansen as part of this process, she spoke of the tribe’s desire to gain federal recognition; the desire to see the economic, ecological, and social harms perpetrated against her people be corrected; the desire to be in relationship with groups like Saint Mark’s Cathedral who are willing to recognize and respect the first peoples of the land on which we gather. I assured her of our commitment to that relationship and that respect for her and the Duwamish people. I made that commitment on behalf of this wonderful community, and I hope you will stand with me and the Vestry in this cause. There is much more to come.

Your Brother in Christ,

The Very Reverend Steven L. Thomason
Dean and Rector


LINKS

Creation Care: Carbon Tracker Training

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UPDATE: A Complete video of the presentation is now available below.

Written instructions are available here.

For help navigating the video above, please refer to this video timeline, or click "view on youtube" and refer to the chapters in the video description.

THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 7-8:30 P.M., via Zoom

Saint Mark’s Cathedral has the bold goal of achieving a net-zero carbon footprint by the year 2030 – both for its facilities and for its congregation. We have encouraged our members to use the carbon tracker adopted by the Episcopal Church at www.sustainislandhome.org to measure your carbon footprint, and the St. Mark’s community group on the site now includes 66 households - that’s great! Now we have an opportunity to learn more about this tool to reduce our carbon footprint, save money, and have fun doing this together as a community. Thursday evening, June 3 from 7-8:30pm we will have the developer of SustainIslandHome, Lisa Altieri, with us for a training on the tool – how to explore the site more to find ways that we can reduce our household carbon footprints. If your household isn’t signed up yet, there will be an opportunity to do that, as well. Join us via Zoom on June 3 to help Saint Mark’s achieve a net-zero carbon footprint together as a community. Register to attend here.

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Creation Care Connect: A Conversation with Elizabeth Hawkins in El Salvador

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MONDAY, MAY 24, 6 P.M., via Zoom

 

THE CREATION CARE MINISTRY & 20s/30s GROUP PRESENTS:

Creation Care Connect: A Conversation with Elizabeth Hawkins in El Salvador

All are welcome to join in a conversation with Elizabeth Hawkins, a cathedral community member who has been living and working in San Salvador since 2019. She will share her perspectives with a Creation Care focus from her view living in El Salvador. Join using this Zoom link.

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Sacred Ground: Cultivating Connections Between Our Food, Faith and Climate

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UPDATE: a video of this event is now available here or below. Click here to download a pdf of resources and references related to this event., and here for a list of recipes shared by panelists. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 7–8:30 p.m. (program) and 8:30–9 p.m. (optional after chat), via Zoom 

How can our food choices reflect our deepest values and beliefs?  Join Saint Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral for a virtual community discussion on food justice via Zoom. Sacred Ground will explore how the ways we grow, harvest, share and repurpose food can forge deeper spiritual connections and invite new opportunities to participate in our community. Panelists will include: Nyema Clark (Nurturing Roots), Stephen Dorsch (The Common Acre), Hannah Cavendish-Palmer (Oxbow Farm), and Aaron Scott (Chaplains on the Harbor). Sacred Ground is hosted by Creation Care and Faith Formation ministries in connection to Earth Day and Faith Climate Action Week.

Register here.

Creation Care All-Parish Survey

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The Creation Care Ministry team wants to hear from YOU! Everyone is the Saint Mark's community is invited to complete the brief survey below to help guide our programming in 2021.

There are just eight simple questions—it should take less than five minutes to complete.

The deadline to submit is February 14, 2021. Thank you!


CREATION CARE SURVEY 2021

“The earth is the Lord's and the fullness thereof, the world and those who dwell therein.”  —Psalm 24:1

Saint Mark’s Cathedral has set a goal for its campus and households to achieve a net zero carbon footprint by 2030. The Creation Care Ministry supports this goal and strives to faithfully address the crisis of climate change. See our Creation Care webpage for more on this.

A “net zero carbon footprint” means we measure and reduce our carbon emissions and offset the remaining carbon footprint by contributing to carbon offset programs. We have chosen the national Episcopal Church’s carbon tracker (https://www.sustainislandhome.org/) because it offers a way to individually and collectively measure and reduce our emissions that come from five basic household areas where we have the most impact on climate change. These five areas—electricity, home heating, transportation, food, and waste—account for 40% of US global emissions.

We ask that you, a member of our Saint Mark’s family, complete this survey to guide us in our work to help our households achieve this goal.

Create your own user feedback survey

“A Life On Our Planet” Watch Party

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 5–7:15 P.M.

 "A Life On Our Planet" Watch Party, Sponsored by 20s&30s and Creation Care ministry

Celebrate a greener holiday season. Join the 20s30s and Creation Care for a watch party via Zoom to view and discuss David Attenborough's documentary, "A Life On Our Planet."  We'll share observations and eco-friendly ways to keep the season festive while thinking about how these actions can become practices that open us to deeper spiritual connections. Prior to the film, we'll send participants vegetarian friendly appetizers from our own Chef Carolina. Questions? Email Emily Meeks (emcmeeks@gmail.com).

Register using this link.

See the trailer below:

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Cathedral Bees Update—Fall 2020

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We are happy to report that we continue to have two thriving hives on the roof of Bloedel Hall. We are especially grateful for the steady help and interest of Jaime Rubio. He has given our bees the extra daily attention they’ve needed this season. It’s been enjoyable to watch the hives flourish. We witness healthy behavior including the bees fanning their wings to regulate temperature in the hive. We continue to see lots of yellow pollen coming in.

It became apparent that we have relatively high numbers of varroa mites which is a huge problem for all beekeepers. A recent commentary says probably every hive in the US has some mite infestation so we decided it was time to bite the bullet and treat using oxalic acid vapor. Thus my “super mask” in the photo below. Since mites get into the cells where eggs are laid by the queen, three rounds of the acid treatment are required to successfully reduce the mite population. This can be done with very little damage to the bees.

You may be wondering about the honey.  We will be leaving honey in the hive this winter so the bees have plenty of nourishment through the wet, cold weather. We hope to harvest next year after the bees have survived and when pandemic precautions are no longer an issue. We ask you to remain patient and continue praying for the health of our winged friends.

Peace to all,
Rob Reid


See previous Cathedral Bees updates here.

Film Screening and Discussion: 2040

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2020, 1-3 P.M.

Film available upon registration 11/13-11/22

Now, more than ever, we need positive voices in the ecological crisis. Join people from around the Episcopal Diocese of Olympia to see director Damon Gameau's "exercise in fact-based dreaming" titled 2040. The film takes a solutions-based approach to how we can, using the technology we already have, mitigate the enormous global issues we currently face. The main themes/solutions looked at in the film are around: empowerment of women and girls; marine regeneration; regenerative agriculture; renewable energy; and circular economy. It's a story of hope, and a powerful tool to encourage people to take action. The film may be watched for no charge between 11/13 and 11/22 using this link. And then join in a conversation about the film with others on Sunday, November 22, 1–3 p.m. Hosted by the Diocese of Olympia.

See the trailer below:

Creation Care Interview: Dr. Lisa Graumlich

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Dr. Lisa Graumlich, in conversation with Kylee Krida

Lisa Graumlich is dean emeritus of the College of the Environment at the University of Washington. She has devoted her career to studying the causes and impacts of climate change, with a special focus on using paleoecological records such as tree-rings to understand the magnitude of human impacts. She is passionate about science communication, and she speaks frequently on climate change impacts and adaptation. She has testified on long-term climate variability before the U.S. House of Representatives Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming and is the president-elect of the American Geophysical Union as of January 1, 2021.

Reversing Global Warming: Introduction to “Drawdown” for People of Faith

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1:00 - 3:00 p.m., Free Zoom meeting. More information/register: https://drawdown4people-of-faith.eventbrite.com

If you're concerned about climate change, join others from around the Diocese for a virtual gathering to look into how you -- and your congregation -- can make a difference. We'll hear from Drawdown Seattle's founding director, Scott Henson, about Project Drawdown—a scientific study that identified 100 solutions that together, could actually reverse global warming by 2050. Then, spend time in dialogue with others to identify the vital role you and your church can play in the movement to help care for creation. This workshop is co-sponsored by the Bishop's Committee for the Environment.

You can watch video from the event with Drawdown Seattle hosted by Saint Mark's Creation Care ministry in May 2020 here.

Earth Ministry Presents: Salmon, Justice, & Community

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 6 P.M.–7:30 P.M.

This program is presented by Earth Ministry/Washington Interfaith Power & Light, a Saint Mark's partner organization with longstanding links to the cathedral.

Salmon are a Northwest icon, a species of great cultural, ecological, and spiritual significance. Author Timothy Egan once defined the Northwest as “wherever the salmon can get to.” In the Northwest, our regional identity is steeped in mighty rivers and the fish therein, and the connections we share run deep.

Join LeeAnne Beres and Rev. John Rosenberg of Earth Ministry to explore the sacredness of salmon and the orcas that depend on them. You'll hear about how the faith community is bringing people together to restore the Lower Snake River for the benefit of all, and have the opportunity to ask questions and put your faith into action.

This event is part of a fall online speaker series hosted by our partners at Save Our Wild Salmon.

Learn more about the event and the speakers here.

Register to attend the event here.

“Wonder in Creation”: Two Wednesday Forums

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TWO WEDNESDAYS, SEPTEMBER 16 & 23, 7–8:30 P.M., via Zoom

Wonder in Creation: A Two-Week Series of Spiritual Practices in Creation

How do you experience God in everyday life? How might your daily living itself be and become a spiritual practice? The Creation Care and Faith Formation ministries will jointly host a two-week series in September to explore how spiritual practices outside bring opportunities to encounter presence, connection and reflection. Each evening, a panel from Saint Mark's will reflect on their own experiences, and you will have time to share your own. We'll also introduce tangible ways to share in active spiritual practices and reflect on how they may nurture reflection and faith in our response.
Join us to "Celebrate the Harvest" on 9/16. The panelists for the first session will be:
  • Rob Reid
  • Carolyn Blount
  • Keiko Maruyama & Jamie Rubio
  • Lisa Graumlich (host)

 

The second session, "Mindful Steps," on 9/23, will feature contributions from:
  • Sarah Elwood
  • Robert Stevens
  • The Rev. Earl Grout, Deacon
  • Brother Paul Dahlke
  • Nancy & Andy Valaas
  • Emily Meeks (host)
For questions and to obtain the Zoom link, contact cchapman@saintmarks.org.

Here are pdfs of lists of references and resources related to the two sessions:

Session 1: Celebrating the Harvest, Sept. 16

Session 2: Take a Next Step: Mindful Steps, Sept. 23


Video of both sessions is now available:

In addition, below are some additional links shared from the chat and conversation during Part 2:

Year of Seattle Parks 

Vote with Creation as a Value
 
Books on Ecology and Spirituality
Diocesan Resource Center - email Sue (resource@ecww.org
)
 
Muck Rack
A podcast series on environmental perspectives by Ashley Aheard
 
The Year You Finally Read About Climate change

"Read about the future of the planet,"
New York Times Book Review.

A Season of Creation

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SEPTEMBER 1–OCTOBER 4, 2020

Saint Mark’s and the greater Episcopal Church joins Christian churches across the world in celebrating the Season of Creation September 1 – October 4. From the Season of Creation website:

“The Season of Creation is a time to renew our relationship with our Creator through repenting, repairing, and rejoicing together. During the Season of Creation, we join our sisters and brothers in the ecumenical family in prayer and action for our common home.”
  • Be inspired by watching Presiding Bishop Curry’s video message below, titled, The Jesus Movement: Good News for All Creation.
  • Weekly "Season of Creation" devotionals will be shared in Sundays & Beyond each week during the month of September — See the complete collection of weekly devotionals below!
  • And plan to attend the "Wonder in Creation" Cathedral Commons offering on September 16 and 23 about spiritual practices in Creation.
You can email marjorie@ringness.org for more information on the ongoing work and conversation of the Creation Care Ministry.

 

Come Hell or High Water: Climate Justice Webinar

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FILM: WATCH ANY TIME BETWEEN MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3–5
WEBINAR: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5, 5 P.M., via Zoom

Please note that some information listed in this week's Sundays & Beyond about this event was in error. A generous member of the Creation Care Ministry has made it possible for people from Saint Mark's to watch the film for free. Visit https://interfaithpowerandlight.salsalabs.org/comehellorhighwaterfilm to register and indicate "Saint Mark's Cathedral" under "congregation." Also, note that the free webinar begins at 5 p.m.

Saint Mark's Creation Care Ministry invites you to view Come Hell or High Water: The Battle for Turkey Creek, an award- winning film about the unjust impact of climate change on an historic black community, sponsored by Interfaith Power and Light. You can view the film for free any time between Monday, August 3 and Wednesday, August 5 — just register here and indicate Saint Mark’s Cathedral as congregation. You will receive a link to watch the film after you register.

Additionally, on Wednesday, August 5, at 5 p.m. PDT, a webinar follows with Leah Mahan, the filmmaker, and Derrick Evans, the activist featured in the film. Sign up separately to attend the webinar using this link.


Come Hell or High Water: The Battle for Turkey Creek follows the painful but inspiring journey of Derrick Evans, a Boston teacher who moves home to coastal Mississippi when the graves of his ancestors are bulldozed to make way for the sprawling city of Gulfport. Over the course of a decade, Derrick and his neighbors stand up to powerful corporate interests and politicians and face ordeals that include Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil disaster in their struggle for self-determination and environmental justice.

This is an award winning film about the unjust impact of climate change on an historic black community. After watching the film, attend the webinar to learn ways we can practice being allies in the fight for safe and healthy black communities. Moderated by Susan Stephenson, the conversation will center around the disproportionate impacts of climate change on black and brown communities.

“This powerful documentary illustrates a classic case of environmental injustice and exposes raw in-your-face Mississippi racial politics. Come Hell or High Water is a perfect lesson that we are not living in a post-racial era.”
-Dr. Robert Bullard, “father of environmental justice”

View the trailer below:

Cathedral Bees Updates—Summer 2020

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Cathedral Bees Update

The cathedral building has two beehives on the roof of Bloedel Hall. Thanks to beekeeper Rob Reid, our bees are thriving! Scroll down to view pictures.

Your prayers for the health of our hives are welcome. For more information about protecting pollinators, visit this link.

If you are interested in helping out with the bees, contact the cathedral and we will put you in touch with Rob.

Sundays & Beyond Update August 30, 2020

The bees and beekeepers have been hard at work. In July, one of the hives lost its queen. However, wild bees are able to create a new queen with remaining larvae, so apiarists Rob and Jaime moved eggs from the healthy hive to the queenless one. Once the queen was established, she then started laying fertile eggs. We're happy to report the success of Rob and Jaime's work - both beehives are now thriving!

Sundays & Beyond Update July 19, 2020

The active honeybee hives on the roof of Bloedel Hall have been busy. And, apparently, they have a sense of humor: Q: Why do virgin bees mate in the air? A: They can’t get any privacy in the hive. Consider planting pollinator-friendly plants in your own garden or window box. And reduce or eliminate pesticides on your plants.

Sundays & Beyond Update July 12, 2020

Did you know St. Mark’s has two active honeybee hives on the roof of Bloedel Hall? Installed on May 10, they include thousands of residents. Recently, our apiarist Rob Reid suspected one of our hives had lost its queen because, when inspecting the frames, he was unable to find eggs. But wild bees are able to create a new queen with remaining larvae. To assist our bees, Rob and Jaime Rubio moved eggs from the healthy hive to the queenless one. Now the bees can create queen cells and feed them “royal jelly.” If all goes well, in less than a month, the new queen will mate in mid air with drone bees and start laying fertile eggs. There’s lots of miraculous science involved. You can see where the expression “the birds and the bees” comes from.

Sundays & Beyond Update July 5, 2020

This week’s thought: The world is facing a mass extinction of species, including pollinators. Bees are critically important to our global food production and nutritional security. Estimates suggest that pollinators directly contribute US$235–$577 billion to global food production each year. Without pollinators, many of the foods we depend on would become scarce, putting life on our planet at risk. When planting your flower garden this summer, consider planting pollinator-friendly plants. Take Earth Day Network’s Pesticide Pledge, and learn about additional actions you can take to help protect pollinators.

 

June Update from Beekeeper Rob

The bee population in our hives is increasing rapidly. We have added a second deep hive box to both hives. I may try to split an existing hive and create a third hive. Providing another queen can be tricky though.

Some of you have joined me in caring for the bees already. Thank you for your company, Jaime, Keiko, Yoshi, Barbara and Steve, and Nancy.

May Update from Beekeeper Rob

Penny and I picked up bees from the Snohomish Bee Company at the Monroe Fairgrounds last Sunday afternoon. Then, we “installed” two “nucs” of bees into two of the existing hives on the roof of Bloedel Hall. I ordered them several months ago and they were shipped here from Northern California a week ago. Each nuc comes with 5 frames and a working queen and thousands of worker bees. It was quick and easy to move the 5 frames, one at a time, into our hives. In fact, miraculously, I saw the queen on one of the frames as I was moving it from nuc box to hive.

 

 

Bees update June 2020

Bees update August 2020

Climate Change Forum

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Climate Change Forum with Drawdown Seattle: MAY 4 & 11, 7–8:30 P.M., Via Zoom

Led by his faith to be a steward of life on this planet, Scott Henson is the co-founder of Drawdown Seattle, a collection of concerned and engaged Seattle citizens who are interested in enacting proven solutions which create the possibility of reversing the global climate crisis we face. Scott will lead two sessions focused on introducing “Project Drawdown” as well as facilitating the beginning of your personal action plans to help reverse global warming. Through videos and group activities, we will learn about a comprehensive plan to reverse global warming from Project Drawdown—a scientific study that identified 100 solutions that, together, could actually reverse global warming by 2050. These solutions encompass the energy we use, the food we eat, and the cities we live in. Let’s shift the conversation, from “Game over” to “Game on!” By the end you will see the vital role you can play in the movement to reverse global warming.

Resources and references relating to this event may be found here. Videos of both parts of this two-part event are available below:

Partner Organizations

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Earth Day Northwest 2020 is a coalition of businesses, non-profits, faith communities, indigenous tribal leaders, and community groups from the Pacific Northwest who have come together to create meaningful change towards the goal of a more livable, equitable, and sustainable city, region, and planet. These effort are focused around the 50th anniversary of Earth Day (April 22, 2020). On the EDNW2020 website, you can learn about local and regional initiatives, take the pledge to take action and empower change, and find a large collection of actions we can take today as individuals. Dean Steve Thomason is a member of the Leadership Council of EDNW2020, and Saint Mark's Cathedral is a partner organization.

Earth Ministry has been a national leader in engaging the faith community in environmental stewardship and advocacy for over 25 years. Saint Mark's members were involved in the founding of the organization in 1992, and the cathedral is a "Greening Congregation" partner.

National Religious Coalition on Creation Care is an interfaith organization with active engagement concerning our world's most pressing environmental issues: Climate, Energy, Forests, Oceans, and Wilderness. The NRCCC's Religious Declaration of Unprecedented Human Emergency is a powerful statement signed by dozens of religious leaders, including Bishop of Olympia Greg Rickel.

The GreenFaith Partnership is a worldwide organization that inspires, educates, organizes, and mobilizes people of diverse religious and spiritual backgrounds globally for environmental action.

Friends of the Saint Mark's Greenbelt. The Greenbelt slope to the south and west of the cathedral is an asset to the entire community that has been entrusted to the cathedral. Friends of Saint Mark’s Greenbelt is a unit of the Green Seattle Partnership which helps maintain and restore the land by removing invasive plants, maintaining the trails and replanting with native vegetation. For infomation about bi-monthly work parties contact:
Joe Roza

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